The English Language in Its Elements and Forms: With a History of Its Origin and Development : Designed for Use in Colleges and Schools

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Harper & Brothers, 1851 - English language - 659 pages
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Contents

Miscellaneous Elements
52
Outward Causes of Change
60
Middle English and Modem
66
Present Tendencies of the Lan
75
Section Pago Section
89
PART II
97
CHAPTER II
106
Genesis of English Vowel 75 Genesis of English Consonant
114
The Natural Significancy of Articulate Sounds
120
Words and Syllables 129 88 Rules for the Division
131
CHAPTER VIII
137
Section Page
144
PART III
146
XX
147
Peculiarities 149 Expedients
152
Classification of the Ele 114 Consonant Letters
153
CHAPTER V
165
Phoenician Hebrew or She
171
PART IV
178
Common Gender
186
Plurals in en
193
The Adjective
204
Defective Comparison
211
The Articles
216
AccMents of Personal Pro
222
CHAPTER VIII
233
CHAPTER XI
239
Interrogative and Respons 246 Declension in AngloSaxon ive Pronouns 239 of Hwat nnd Hwa
240
CHAPTER XII
241
CHAPTER XIII
244
The Verb 244 253 Transitive Verbs
245
Classification of Verbs 245 254 Intransitive Verbs
246
The Persons of Verbs
247
The Numbers of Verbs
248
The Tenses of the Verb
249
Future Tense
250
Past Perfect Tense
251
Greek Tenses
252
The AngloSaxon Modes
253
Potential Mode
254
Inflection of the Infinitive Mode
256
View of English Infinitives
257
The Participles
258
The Past Participle
259
The Letter y prefixed to the Past Participle
261
CHAPTER XV
262
May and Can used in Two
264
Classification of Auxiliary Verbs in respect to their Mode of Construction
265
CHAPTER XVI
268
The Verb Substantive 268 290 Conjugation of the Verb To Worth
269
8ection Page Section Page
274
The Vowel of the Partiei Verb To Take
280
CHAPTER XVIII
287
CHAPTER XIX
295
CHAPTER XX
302
Adverbs
308
CHAPTER XXV
319
Sectaoa Page Section Page 325 Prepositions 319 327 Origin of certain Prepositions
321
Simple and Compound Prep 328 The Nature and Office of oeitions 320 Prepositions
323
CHAPTER XXVI
325
Conjunctions 325 332 The Origin of Conjunctions
329
Harriss Classification 325 with the views of Horne 331 Connectives and Disjunctives 325 Tooke
330
Derivation
334
The Constituent Elements of the English Language
335
Development of the Anglo Saxon Portion of the Lan guage
342
Pronominal Elements
345
Roots in the English Lan guage
346
Specimen of a Vocabulary of English Roots
351
The English Roots To Wit and To Know
356
English Suffixes
357
Hood or Head
358
Bom
359
Net
360
Teutonic Prefixes in the En glish Language
362
Disuse of Teutonic Suffix es
364
The English Prefix A
367
The English Prefix Be
369
The English Prefix For
371
The English Prefix Mis
372
The Classical Element in the English Language
375
Development of the Latin Portion of our Language
376
English Prefixes derived from the Latin
380
The Inseparable Particle Re
383
Romanic Suffixes
384
English Prefixes derived from the French
386
Development of the Greek Portion of our Language
389
Greek Suffixes
390
English Prefixes derived from the Greek
393
The Formation of Com pound Words
398
Compound Words in English
401
Disguised English Com pounds
405
Accidental Coincidences
409
Double Forms in the En glish Language
411
Illusive Etymologies
414
Diminutives
420
Origin of English Surnames
421
Names of Places
427
Names of the Days of the Week
429
LOGICAL FORMS
430
CHAPTER III
439
CHAPTER I
447
Prepositions
453
Section Page 415 Argument
458
Every Syllogism must have Three Terms
459
Mode of a Syllogism
460
The Entbymeme
461
The Rhetorical Enthymeme
462
Sorites
463
Dilemma
464
ER V
465
Fallaoy
466
Negative Premisses
467
Examples of Fallacies
468
The Objective Case
480
CHAPTER III
485
Adjectives belong to Sub 461 Each Evtry Either
492
The Collocation of Adjeo 463 Ml None o
493
Pronominal Adjectives 491 465 Definite Numeral Adjectives
494
CHAPTER IV
502
Demonstrative Pronouns
509
CHAPTER V
521
Section Page 512 Concord of Person
526
A Verb having a Collective Noon for a Nominative
528
Intransitive Verbs followed by Nouns kindred to their own
532
Copulative Verbs
534
Construction of the Infini tive
535
The Verbs Bid Dare c
536
Construction of the Impera tive Mode
537
Nature of the Imperative Mode
538
Though and Although are peculiar
539
Peculiarities in the Use of the Preterites
540
Verbal Character of Parti ciples
541
Exercises under Rule XXXVH
545
Exercises under Rule XLI
546
Exercises under Rule XLVI
547
Certain Uses of the Verb with Examples
548
CHAPTER VI
550
The Collocation of Adverbs
552
Correspondent Adverbs
553
The Collocation of Preposi 557 CHAPTER VIII
557
Convertibility
558
Conditional Conjunctions
559
CHAPTER IX
565
CHAPTER XI
577
CHAPTER XII
585
Love of Troth
591
Eloquence related to a strong Sense of Right
592
Eloquence related to an End
593
Eloquence related to good Sense
594
Eloquence related to a De sire to Speak
595
Eloqenoe related to a strong Will
596
Definition of Rhetorical Forms
597
Section Page 609 Rhetorical Forms as the Me dium of Intellection
598
Rhetoric as interfering with Grammatical Construc tion
599
Rhetorical Language and Plain Language
600
Directions for the Study of Rhetorical Forms
601
Allusion
605
Anaccenosis
606
Antithesis
607
Antonomasia
609
Aposiopesis
610
Catachresis
611
Climax
612
Ecphonesis or Exclamation
613
Epanalepsis
614
Erotesis
615
Hypotyposis
616
Irony
617
Litotes
618
Metonymy
619
Parable
620
Prosopopoeia
621
Proverb
622
Simile
623
Syllepsis
624
Synecdoche
625
CHAPTER IV
632
Section Puge 659 Liveliness of Expression
635
Periodic Sentences and Loose Sentences
636
EE V
637
PART VIII
638
Meter
639
Measures
640
Dissyllabic Measures
641
Rhyme
642
Imperfect Rhymes
643
Double and Triple Rhymes
644
Middle Rhyme
645
Sectional Rhyme
646
Poetical License with Ex amples
647
Elision
648
CHAPTER II
649
Iambic Dimeter
650
Iambic Trimeter
651
Iambic Pentameter
652
Iambic Hexameter
653
Iambic Heptameter
654
Perspicuity 632 658 The Unintelligible from
656
Trochaic Tetrameter
657
Trochaic Hexameter
658
Anapestio Monometer 658 696 Anapestic Trimeter 695 Anapestic Dimeter
659
Amphibrach Monometer
660
Amphibrach Tetrameter
661
Dactylic Monometer with 704 Dactylic Trimeter
663
Gays Stanza
664
Heroic Couplets
665
Terza Rima
666
Common Meter
667
Definition
668
The Semicolon
670
The Colon
671
The Interrogation Point
672
The Hyphen
673
The Diteresis
674
PART VII
vii
Gibbs of Yale College who has been well known as a successful laborer
xv
RHETORICAL FORMS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
xxix
Section pag
31
CHAPTER VIII
189
Numerals 215 195 Two and Tiro Three
193
CHAPTER I
199
Compound Numerals of the Three 216
216
PRELIMINARY STATEMENTS
467
Definition of Rhetoric 589 599 Emotion derived from
591
Double Meaning 633 rious Causes
657
634
721

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Page 617 - I see before me the Gladiator lie ; He leans upon his hand — his manly brow Consents to death, but conquers agony. And his droop'd head sinks gradually low, And through his side the last drops, ebbing slow From the red gash, fall heavy one by one, Like the first of a thunder-shower ; and now The arena swims around him — he is gone Ere ceased the inhuman shout which hailed the wretch who won.
Page 585 - In words, as fashions, the same rule will hold; Alike fantastic, if too new, or old: Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.
Page 184 - Of Law there can be no less acknowledged than that her seat is the bosom of God ; her voice the harmony of the world. All things in heaven and earth do her homage ; the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power.
Page 607 - FATHER of all ! in every age, In every clime adored, By saint, by savage, and by sage, Jehovah, Jove, or Lord ! Thou great first Cause, least understood, Who all my sense confined To know but this, that Thou art good, And that myself am blind ; Yet gave me, in this dark estate, To see the good from ill ; And binding nature fast in fate, Left free the human will.
Page 132 - And there lay the rider distorted and pale, "With the dew on his brow, and the rust on his mail ; And the tents were all silent, the banners alone, The lances unlifted, the trumpet unblown.
Page 132 - Like the leaves of the forest when Summer is green, That host with their banners at sunset were seen: Like the leaves of the forest when Autumn hath blown, That host on the morrow lay withered and strown. For the Angel of Death spread his wings on the blast, And breathed in the face of the foe as he passed...
Page 654 - Heaven doth with us as we with torches do, Not light them for themselves ; for if our virtues Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike As if we had them not. Spirits are not finely...
Page 581 - The notice which you have been pleased to take of my labors, had it been early, had been kind ; but it has been delayed till I am indifferent, and cannot enjoy it; till I am solitary, and cannot impart it; till I am known, and do not want it.
Page 59 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
Page 624 - Vanbrugh , and is a good example of his heavy though imposing style (*Lie heavy on him, Earth, for he Laid many a heavy load on thee"), with a Corinthian portico in the centre and two projecting wings.

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