Karl Marx

Front Cover
Verso, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 175 pages
0 Reviews
This classic biography of Karl Marx, complete with Gareth Stedman Jones' poignant introduction, is unlike any other account of its subject. Focusing as much on Marx's private life as on his public persona and work, this classic biography looks in detail at his relationship with his mother and father, wife and friends, and includes generous quotations from a wide range of correspondence in addition to virtually every photograph in existence of Marx and his closest associates.

Blumenberg examines Marx's early writing as a schoolboy and his romantic poetry whilst a student, as well as his exchanges with close friend and collaborator Frederick Engels. In these pages are moving accounts of the privations of Marx's poverty-stricken life in London and the tragedies which struck his family, as well as discussions of his intellectual development and political activity.Including virtually every photograph in existence of Marx and his closest associates, and focusing as much on his private life as on his public persona and work, Werner Blumenberg's biography provides an intimate portrait of the making of a complex intellectual the New Yorker dubbed "the next most influential thinker."
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Problem of a Biography
1
Life at the University Conflict with his Father
16
In the Ranks of the Young Hegelians and
33
Communism
46
First Years in London The Sleepless Night
87
The Wretchedness of Existence
98
Journalism and Contemporary History
114
Marxs Dislike of German Social
122
The International A Life and Death Struggle
132
The Unfinished Lifework
143
The Finale and Posthumous Fame
152
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2000)

Werner Blumenberg was a member of the underground against Hitler both in Germany and as an migr in Holland.

Gareth Stedman Jones is a Fellow of King's College, Cambridge University and in 2010 become Professor of the History of Ideas at Queen Mary, University of London. He is the author of An End to Poverty? and Languages of Class: Studies in Working-Class History 1832-1982.