A Place of Their Own: Creating the Deaf Community in America

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Gallaudet University Press, 1989 - Education - 212 pages
6 Reviews
Using original sources, this unique book focuses on the Deaf community during the nineteenth century. Largely through schools for the deaf, deaf people began to develop a common language and a sense of community. A Place of Their Own brings the perspective of history to bear on the reality of deafness and provides fresh and important insight into the lives of Deaf Americans.
 

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Review: A Place of Their Own: Creating the Deaf Community in America

User Review  - Mary - Goodreads

This is a good book. I'm learning more about Deaf history and community. It reinforces what I already know. Read full review

Review: A Place of Their Own: Creating the Deaf Community in America

User Review  - Seed - Goodreads

Very dry, very boring but it is also informative. I knew a bit of the info already though and there's more interesting ways to learn about Deaf Culture than this specific book. Read full review

Contents

Prophets and Physicians
1
To Educate a Deaf Person
10
Braidwood and the Bollings
21
A Permanent School
29
The Residential School Experience
47
A Deaf State
60
A College
71
Organizing
87
Cultural Connections
98
The Assault on Sign Language
106
The Struggle to Save Signs
128
Marriage
142
Employing the Deaf Community
155
Epilogue
169
Bibliography
192
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About the author (1989)

John Vickrey Van Cleve is former Professor of History at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

The late Barry Crouch was Professor of History at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., for twenty-one years. His books include The Freedmen's Bureau and Black Texans and The Dance of Freedom: Texas African Americans during Reconstruction.

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