Patriots

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Simon and Schuster, Mar 15, 1989 - Biography & Autobiography - 640 pages
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Mile 81 isStand by Me meets Christine—the story of an insatiable car and a heroic kid.

At Mile 81 on the Maine turnpike is a boarded up rest stop, a place where high school kids drink and get into the kind of trouble high school kids have always gotten into. It’s the place where Pete Simmons goes when his older brother, who’s supposed to be looking out for him, heads off to the gravel pit to play “paratroopers over the side.” Pete, armed only with the magnifying glass he got for his tenth birthday, finds a discarded bottle of vodka in the boarded up burger shack and drinks enough to pass out.

Not much later, a mud-covered station wagon (which is strange because there hadn’t been any rain in New England for over a week) veers into the Mile 81 rest area, ignoring the sign that says “closed, no services.” The driver’s door opens but nobody gets out.

Doug Clayton, an insurance man from Bangor, is driving his Prius to a conference in Portland. On the backseat are his briefcase and suitcase and in the passenger bucket is a King James Bible, what Doug calls “the ultimate insurance manual,” but it isn’t going to save Doug when he decides to be the Good Samaritan and help the guy in the broken down wagon. He pulls up behind it, puts on his four-ways, and then notices that the wagon has no plates.

Ten minutes later, Julianne Vernon, pulling a horse trailer, spots the Prius and the wagon, and pulls over. Julianne finds Doug Clayton’s cracked cell phone near the wagon door – and gets too close herself. By the time Pete Simmons wakes up from his vodka nap, there are a half a dozen cars at the Mile 81 rest stop. Two kids – Rachel and Blake Lussier – and one horse named Deedee are the only living left. Unless you maybe count the wagon.
 

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Patriots: the men who started the American Revolution

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Langguth, a journalism professional and a former Vietnam correspondent, offers a narrative history of the American Revolution (1761-1783). Writing in a dramatic style, he focuses on major political ... Read full review

Contents

Otis 176162
13
Adams 176263
28
Henry 176364
41
Politics 1765
66
Hancock 176568
83
Occupation 176869
109
Massacre 1770
125
Trial 1770
142
Jefferson 77575
335
Independence 1776
352
Long Island 1776
366
New York 1776
386
Trenton 1776
399
Princeton 77677
420
Saratoga 777
448
Valley Forge 77778
461

Tea 77r73
163
Port Act 774
188
Congress 77475
204
Lexington 775
224
Arnold 775
255
Bunker Hill 775
271
Washington 775
289
Lee 775
314
Paris 177879
488
Yorktown 1781
510
Victory 1781
526
Farewell 178183
542
Acknowledgments
564
Bibliography
608
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About the author (1989)

A. J. Langguth, professor of journalism at the University of Southern California and author of several fiction and nonfiction books, lives in Los Angeles, California.

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