The Lost Atlantis: And Other Ethnographic Studies

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D. Douglas, 1892 - America - 411 pages
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Page 78 - There shall be sung another golden Age, The rise of Empire and of Arts, The Good and Great inspiring epic Rage, The wisest Heads and noblest Hearts.
Page 75 - And portance in my travel's history; Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak, — such was the process: And of the Cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Page 34 - So that if the invention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities from place to place, and consociateth the most remote regions in participation of their fruits, how much more are letters to be magnified, which as ships pass through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other?
Page 77 - And later times things more unknown shall show. Why then should witless man so much misween That nothing is but that which he hath seen?
Page 379 - For several years butcher's meat was a stranger in the house, while all the members of the family exerted themselves to the utmost of their strength, and rather beyond it, in the labours of the . farm. My brother, at the age of thirteen , assisted in thrashing the crop of corn, and at fifteen was the principal labourer on the farm, for we had no hired servant, male or female.
Page 235 - Wanting it, what savage unsocial nights must our ancestors have spent, wintering in caves and unillumined fastnesses ! They must have lain about and grumbled at one another in the dark. What repartees could have passed when you must have felt about for a smile, and handled a neighbour's cheek to be sure that he understood it ? This accounts for the seriousness of the elder poetry. It has a sombre cast (try Hesiod or Ossian), derived from the tradition of those unlantern'd nights. Jokes came in with...
Page 359 - And assuredly, there is no mark of degradation about any part of its structure. It is, in fact, a fair average human skull, which might have belonged to a philosopher, or might have contained the thoughtless brains of a savage.
Page 70 - Northmen rests on narratives, mythological in form, and obscure in meaning; ancient, yet not contemporary.
Page 38 - Strong evidence has been adduced that he reached America, and that his posterity exist there to this day, on the southern branches of the Missouri*, retaining their complexion, their language, and, in some degree, their arts.
Page 62 - They sailed for a long time, and until they came at last to a river, which flowed down from the land into a lake, and so into the sea.

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