The March: A Novel

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, Sep 20, 2005 - Fiction - 384 pages
47 Reviews
WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD
WINNER OF THE PEN/FAULKNER AWARD
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

In 1864, Union general William Tecumseh Sherman marched his sixty thousand troops through Georgia to the sea, and then up into the Carolinas. The army fought off Confederate forces, demolished cities, and accumulated a borne-along population of freed blacks and white refugees until all that remained was the dangerous transient life of the dispossessed and the triumphant. In E. L. Doctorow’s hands the great march becomes a floating world, a nomadic consciousness, and an unforgettable reading experience with awesome relevance to our own times.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kerns222 - LibraryThing

A pleasant read with pages of death and dismemberment thrown in. The good characters do well (mostly) The bad ones get it (mostly). A 21st century imagined look back at race and the Civil War built ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - charlie68 - LibraryThing

Various characters stories intertwine during General Sherman's march through the southlands. Pathos and comedy mix to create an enjoyable tour through this era. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
15
Section 3
25
Section 4
36
Section 5
42
Section 6
51
Section 7
56
Section 8
63
Section 19
141
Section 20
148
Section 21
153
Section 22
156
Section 23
161
Section 24
169
Section 25
175
Section 26
198

Section 9
69
Section 10
72
Section 11
76
Section 12
81
Section 13
86
Section 14
91
Section 15
114
Section 16
123
Section 17
129
Section 18
137
Section 27
213
Section 28
226
Section 29
239
Section 30
266
Section 31
292
Section 32
302
Section 33
309
Section 34
329
Section 35
336
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

E. L. Doctorow’s works of fiction include Welcome to Hard Times, The Book of Daniel, Ragtime, Loon Lake, World’s Fair, Billy Bathgate, The Waterworks, City of God, The March, Homer & Langley, and Andrew’s Brain. Among his honors are the National Book Award, three National Book Critics Circle awards, two PEN/Faulkner awards, and the presidentially conferred National Humanities Medal. In 2009 he was shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize, honoring a writer’s lifetime achievement in fiction, and in 2012 he won the PEN/ Saul Bellow Award for Achievement in American Fiction, given to an author whose “scale of achievement over a sustained career places him in the highest rank of American literature.” In 2013 the American Academy of Arts and Letters awarded him the Gold Medal for Fiction. In 2014 he was honored with the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction.


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