The Sorrows of Werter: A German Story ...

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Contents

I
1
II
6
III
9
IV
11
V
12
VI
15
VII
21
VIII
26
XIX
96
XX
99
XXI
101
XXII
102
XXIII
103
XXIV
105
XXV
106
XXVI
111

IX
32
X
37
XI
64
XII
66
XIII
71
XIV
75
XV
90
XVI
92
XVII
94
XVIII
95
XXVII
114
XXVIII
117
XXIX
137
XXX
139
XXXI
146
XXXII
147
XXXIII
149
XXXIV
152
XXXV
155

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Page 26 - About a league from the town is a place called Walheim,* It is delightfully situated on the side of a hill, and by proceeding along one of the footpaths which lead out of the village, you can have a view of the whole valley. A good old woman lives there, who keeps a small inn.
Page 163 - you do not forget, I know you do not, the evenings when we three, during the absence of my father, used to sit at our little round table, after the children were gone to bed. You often had a book in your hand, but you seldom read any of it — and who would not have preferred the conversation of that delightful woman to every thing in the world? She was beautiful, mild, chearful, and always active. God knows how often I have knelt before him, and prayed that I might be like her.
Page 160 - I faid, holding out my hand to her, and my eyes full of tears, " we fhall again fee one another here and hereafter.
Page 42 - I crofled the court, went up ftairs, and as I entered the apartment I faw fix children, the eldeft of which was but eleven -years old, all jumping round a young woman, very elegantly fhaped, and dre/Ted in a plain white gown with pink ribands.
Page vi - ... within his knowledge. It went through several editions in German, and soon made its way into France. About two years since the English translator met with it; and being struck with the uncommon genius and originality of the thoughts, and the energy with which they are expressed, translated some of the letters from the French; and led on by the beauty of the work, which...
Page 124 - Pried, and like the Pharifee you thank God that you are not like one of them. I have more than once experienced the effects of drinking ; my paffions have always bordered upon extravagance, and I am not afhamed to own it.
Page 100 - I fhall not fee Charlotte to.day ; company', whi'ch I could not avoid, hinders me. What do. you think. I have done ? I fent the little boy .who waits upon me, that I might at leaft fee fomebody that had been near her. With what impatience I waited for his return, and with what pleafnre I faw him ! I fhould certainly have taken him in my arms if I had not been afhamed.
Page 142 - Weak mortal ! all things appear little to you, for you are little yourfelf. Craggy mountains, deferts untrodden by " the foot of man, even the unknown confines of the immenfe ocean, are animated by the breath of the Eternal, and -every atom to which he has given -exiftence and life, finds favour in his fight.
Page 44 - Come family bufinefs, made me forget to give my children their little meal, and they don't like to receive it from any body elfe." I muttered fomething, I don't know what— my whole foul was taken up with her air, her voice, her manner; and before I could recover myfelf, fhe ran into her room for her gloves and fan.
Page 154 - Charlotte does not at leaft allow me the melancholy confolation to bathe her hand with my tears, I am obliged to leave her, and run and wander about the country. I climb fteep rocks ; I break my way through copfes, amongft amongft thorns and briars which tear me to pieces, and I feel a little relief.

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