Environmental Issues in Chemical Perspective

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SUNY Press, 1980 - Environmental chemistry - 374 pages
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An in-depth presentation of the chemistry required to evaluate the choices we must make regarding our environment, this study has four parts: energy, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Each part is followed by problem sets that require the application of chemical principles to such issues as dwindling natural gas and petroleum resources; fission and fusion as energy sources; CO2 build-up and the greenhouse effect; automobile emission control; acid rain; eutrophication of lakes; lead, mercury, and cadmium poisoning; and environmental links to cancer. An answer manual for the problems is included.

Social, political, and economic concerns are also covered. The authors show how chemists and non-chemist decision-makers can take account of each other's perspectives.
 

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Contents

ENERGY
1
Carbon Cycle
3
Human Energy Consumption
6
Petroleum
11
Survey of Alternative Energy Sources
17
Coal
20
Nuclear Fission
28
Nuclear Power
35
Automotive Emissions
165
Sulfur Dioxide
171
Primary Particles
174
Summary
176
HYDROSPHERE
185
Acidity
193
Hardness
205
Eutrophication
223

Weapons Proliferation
38
Radioactivity
43
Fusion Power
51
Solar Energy
57
Energy Storage
69
Thermal Pollution
74
Summary
87
ATMOSPHERE
97
Greenhouse Effect
107
Atmospheric Structure
118
Ozone Chemistry
124
Nitrogen Oxides
128
Chlorofluoromethanes
136
Oxide Chemistry
138
Air Pollution
151
The Oceans
232
Sewage Treatment
235
Drinking Water Supplies
246
Agricultural Pollution
247
Summary
249
BIOSPHERE
257
Nutrition
278
Insecticides
289
Inadvertent Contamination by Toxic Organic Chemicals
307
Contamination by Toxic Metals
316
Cancer
327
Conclusion
350
APPENDIX
359
Copyright

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Page 358 - McCann, J., and Ames, BN: A simple method for detecting environmental carcinogens as mutagens.

About the author (1980)

Thomas G. Spiro is professor of chemistry at Princeton University.

William M. Stigliani is research associate at the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center of the State University of New York at Albany.

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