The Harleian Miscellany: A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, as Well in Manuscript as in Print, Volume 5

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Robert Dutton, 1810
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Page 464 - Then said all the trees unto the bramble, Come thou, and reign over us. And the bramble said unto the trees, If in truth ye anoint me king over you, then come and put your trust in my shadow : and if not, let fire come out of the bramble, and devour the cedars of Lebanon.
Page 115 - Our soul is escaped even as a bird out of the snare of the fowler ; the snare is broken, and we are delivered.
Page 41 - Valiant indeed, and prosperous to win a field ; but to know the end and reason of winning, unjudicious and unwise : in good or bad success, alike unteachable. For the sun, which we want, ripens wits as well as fruits ; and as wine and oil are imported to us from abroad, so must ripe understanding, and many civil virtues, be imported into our minds from foreign writings, and examples of best ages : we shall else miscarry still, and come short in the attempts of any great enterprise.
Page 578 - An Act for [the] Uniformity of Common Prayer and Service in the Church and Administration of the Sacraments...
Page 80 - It was true, we give law to hares and deer, because they be beasts of chase ; but it was never accounted either cruelty, or foul play, to knock foxes and wolves on the head as they can be found, because they be beasts of prey.
Page 410 - Curse not the king, no not in thy thought; and curse not the rich in thy bedchamber: for a bird of the air shall carry the voice, and that which hath wings shall tell the matter.
Page 490 - Lord, I am coming as fast as I can. I know I must pass ' through the shadow of death, before I can come to see Thee. ' But it is but umbra mortis, a mere shadow of death, a little ' darkness upon nature; but Thou by Thy merits and passion ' hast broken through the jaws of death.
Page 506 - While the earth remains, seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night, shall not cease.
Page 114 - Say not ye, There are yet four months, and then cometh harvest ? behold, I say unto you, Lift up your eyes, and look on the fields ; for they are white already to harvest.
Page 504 - Yea, the stork in the heaven knoweth her appointed times ; and the turtle, and the crane, and the swallow, observe the time of their coming; but my people know not the judgment of the LORD.

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