The Unfinished Revolution: Social Movement Theory and the Gay and Lesbian Movement

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 26, 2001 - Social Science - 231 pages
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The Unfinished Revolution compares the post-Second World War histories of the American and British gay and lesbian movements with an eye toward understanding how distinct political institutional environments affect the development, strategies, goals, and outcomes of a social movement. The two case study chapters function as brief historical sketches that provide an introduction to British and American gay and lesbian history. An appendix provides a useful evaluative summary of common social movement theories. The book will be of value to academics and students of sociology, political science, and history.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Asked and answered how questions can condition conclusions in social movement theory
11
Tracing the rainbow an historical sketch of the American gay and lesbian movement
19
Tracing the rainbow an historical sketch of the British gay and lesbian movement
67
Where and how it comes to pass interest group interaction with political institutions
99
Asking the unasked question grappling with the culture variable
123
Conclusion
158
a survey of social movement theories
167
Notes
187
Bibliography
214
Index
226
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Gender politics
Surya Monro
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About the author (2001)

Stephen M. Engel is an Assistant Professor of Politics at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. He holds a PhD in Political Science from Yale University as well as an MA in Social Thought from New York University and a BA in interdisciplinary social science from Wesleyan University. In 2007-8, he held a research fellowship at the American Bar Foundation where he conducted research on anti-Court activism in the United States. He is the author of American Politicians Confront the Court: Opposition Politics and Changing Responses to Judicial Power (Cambridge University Press, 2011). He has also published in Studies in American Political Development and Law and Social Inquiry.

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