Cyclopedia of American Horticulture: Comprising Suggestions for Cultivation of Horticultural Plants, Descriptions of the Species of Fruits, Vegetables, Flowers, and Ornamental Plants Sold in the United States and Canada, Together with Geographical and Biographical Sketches, Volumes 1-4

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Macmillan, 1902 - Gardening
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Page 1735 - ... feet apart and the plants from twelve to fifteen inches apart in rows, keeping off the runners until late in July and then allowing the runners to grow and root at will making a matted row. In this old system many plants are almost on top of others, the roots barely in the ground, and they suffer in a season of drought. The rows are so wide that to pick fruit in the center it is almost necessary to crush fruits on the outside of the row. This system gives few large first-class fruits. The up-to-date...
Page 1709 - ... time, will prevent the growth of fungi. However, if applied in this form, the solution will burn the foliage. Four pounds of quicklime in six pounds of copper will neutralize the caustic action. When sulfate of copper and lime are added in this proportion, the compound is Bordeaux mixture. Weighing of copper and lime at time of mixing is very inconvenient. Bordeaux mixture is best when used within a few hours after being mixed. Therefore a stock mixture of Bordeaux is impracticable. It is, however,...
Page 1709 - The action of neither is weakened, and the Paris green loses all caustic properties. For insects which chew. LONDON PURPLE. This is used in the same proportion as Paris green, but as it is more caustic it should be applied with two or three times its weight of lime, or with the Bordeaux mixture. The composition of...
Page 1890 - All of the early fruit is picked by hand, and only the ripe berries are gathered. Later in the season, particularly on "old burns," ie on areas which will have to be burned over the next year, the fruit is gathered with a "blueberry rake." This is an implement somewhat similar to the cranberry rake in use on Cape Cod, and may be likened to a dust pan, the bottom of which is composed of stiff parallel wire rods. The fruit may be gathered much more quickly and more cheaply by means of the rake. The...
Page 1889 - ... lease" is burned over. This burning must be done very early in the spring, before the ground becomes dry; otherwise the fire goes too deep, the humus is burned from the ground and most of the bushes are killed. Many hundred acres on what should be the best part of the '"barrens
Page 1710 - Copper sulphate 1 pound Water 15 gallons Dissolve the copper sulphate in the water when it is ready for use. This should never be applied to foliage, but must be used before the buds break. For peaches and nectarines use twenty-four gallons of water.
Page 1890 - ... attention in cultivation. PROPAGATION. The spread of any plant in cultivation is, to a large extent, dependent upon the activity of! progressive nurserymen. If these men find a given class of plants difficult of propagation, such plants are seldom widely cultivated. In the past one chief drawback to the dissemination of the blueberries has been the difficulty, or supposed difficulty, of propagation. The few nurserymen who have offered them for sale have usually depended upon the native heaths...
Page 1893 - Funston, in a recent report on the flora of Alaska, says concerning this species: (2) "A shrub four feet in height forms a large part of the undergrowth near the coast (Yakutat bay, Alaska). The dark purple berries, rather larger than peas, are collected in great quantities by the Indians who use them fresh and preserve them for winter, drying the fresh berries by artificial heat. In September, immediately after the close of the fishing season, nearly all the women and children devote themselves...
Page 1889 - Bilberry," and "Whortleberry" usually mentioned as "common names" by American writers, are seldom or never heard among the common people in this country, while "Huckleberry" is often used indiscriminately for plants of this genus and for the Gaylussacias. In the central states the term Huckleberry is usually applied to Vaccinium corymbosum, while Blueberry is given to the low growing species like Canadense and Pennsylvanicum. In New England, Huckleberry is reserved for species of Gaylussacia, while...
Page 1710 - Hellebore. Fresh white hellebore 1 ounce Water 3 gallons Apply when thoroughly mixed. This poison is not so energetic as the arsenites, and may be used a short time before the sprayed parts mature.

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