The Cambridge Introduction to Sanskrit

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 21, 2017 - History - 431 pages
"Why learn Sanskrit? There are many good answers to this question. Sanskrit is studied by scholars of language, religion and literature, by historians, sociologists and anthropologists and anyone else with an interest in India's cultural heritage. Sanskrit as a language is quite simply beautiful, its structure complex enough to be interesting, but straightforward enough to be manageable. Knowledge of Sanskrit grants access to an enormous body of literature. Literary writing uses the means of a language to not just express a thought, but to express it in an interesting, appealing, artful way. Thus it always is more rewarding to read a work of literature in its original language. Yet the fact that much may be lost in translation is especially true in relation to Sanskrit: the breadth of meaning of Sanskrit words, and the way this breadth is used in Sanskrit poetry (especially in the form of puns and word play) sometimes make expressions or even whole sentences or texts nearly impossible to translate. Only in the original can one truly enjoy them. Furthermore, Sanskrit literature offers a wide window onto India: Sanskrit is the language not just of the sacred writings of Hinduism (and some of Buddhism and Jainism), but also of many other texts that have greatly influenced Indian culture and society over the course of more than two millennia"--
 

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Contents

List of Abbreviations
7
CHAPTER 2
18
CHAPTER 7
22
CHAPTER
25
Expressed
31
CHAPTER 4
38
CHAPTER
40
CHAPTER 6
57
CHAPTER 23
232
CHAPTER 24
241
Noun Stem Gradation Consonant
251
CHAPTER 26
261
CHAPTER 27
271
CHAPTER 28
278
CHAPTER 29
285
CHAPTER 30
294

Vowel Gradation and Why We Need
68
CHAPTER 8
80
CHAPTER 9
92
CHAPTER 11
109
CHAPTER 12
118
CHAPTER 13
125
CHAPTER 14
137
CHAPTER 15
150
CHAPTER 16
160
CHAPTER 17
172
CHAPTER 18
178
CHAPTER 19
188
CHAPTER 21
207
CHAPTER 22
221
CHAPTER 31
305
CHAPTER 33
314
CHAPTER 34
322
CHAPTER 35
328
CHAPTER 36
334
CHAPTER 37
341
asauadas
351
Some Irregular Nouns
357
APPENDICES
365
Appendix II Background
373
List
385
Index
430
Copyright

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About the author (2017)

A. M. Ruppel was the Townsend Senior Lecturer in the Greek, Latin and Sanskrit Languages at Cornell University, New York for nine years, and is currently Head of Sanskrit at St James Senior Boys' School in Ashford, UK. Ruppel has received the Stephen and Margery Russell Distinguished Teaching Award as well as a grant from the Cornell Center for Teaching Excellence, and is the author of Absolute Constructions in Early Indo-European (Cambridge, 2012).

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