Leabhar na Feinne. Vol. I. Gaelic texts: Heroic Gaelic ballads collected in Scotland chiefly from 1512 to 1871, copied from old manuscripts preserved at Edinburgh and elsewhere, and from rare books, and orally collected since 1859; with lists of collections, and of their contents; and with a short account of the documents quoted

Front Cover
Spottiswoode, 1872 - Ballads, Scottish Gaelic - 224 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Popular passages

Page xix - How doth the little busy bee Improve each shining hour, And gather honey all the day From every opening flower!
Page xix - How skilfully she builds her cell! How neat she spreads the wax ! And labours hard to store it well With the sweet food she makes. In works of labour or of skill I would be busy too: For Satan finds some mischief still For idle hands to do. In books, or work, or healthful play Let my first years be past, That I may give for every day Some good account at last.
Page i - Heroic Gaelic Ballads collected in Scotland chiefly from 1512 to 1871, copied from old manuscripts preserved at Edinburgh and elsewhere, and from rare books; and orally collected since 1859; with lists of collections, and of their contents ; and with a short account of the documents quoted.
Page 137 - THE BATTLE FOUGHT AT VENTRY, IN THE COUNTY of Kerry, in the Third Century of the Christian era. between Daire Donn, Monarch of the World, and the Fenians. To be edited by the Rev. James Goodman. 4. THE BATTLE о» CASTLEKNOCK, пг THE COUNTY OP DUBLIN.
Page 127 - Son of the noble Fingal, Oscian, prince of men! what tears run down the cheeks of age? what shades thy mighty soul? Memory, son of Alpin, memory wounds the aged. Of former times are my thoughts; my thoughts are of the noble Fingal.
Page 19 - Deirdri and Clan Uisneach, or the three brothers, Naos, Ainle, and Ardan, sons of Uisneach, is very affecting and tragic. Mr. Campbell says : — " The story of Deirdri is related to Indian Epics, and is an Aryan romance which pervades the whole world. A beautiful girl, shut up to baulk a prophecy, is beloved by an old King. She runs away with a family of brothers, and after adventures of many kinds, the story ends in a tragedy.
Page xxix - But the Committee has not been able to obtain any one poem the same in title and tenor with the poems published by him.
Page 36 - ... for him in the first part of the poem, it is a strong proof of Ossian's masterly genius that he durst adventure to produce to us another hero, compared with whom, even the great Cuthullin, should be only an inferior personage; and who should rise as far above him, as Cuthullin rises above the rest. Here indeed, in the character and description of Fingal, Ossian triumphs almost unrivalled : for we may boldly defy all antiquity to shew us any hero equal to Fingal.
Page 218 - I asked him the reason; he told me it was out of regard to the memory of that hero. I asked him if he thought that the spirit of that hero was present; he said not; but he thought it well became them who descended from him to honour his memory...
Page 218 - There is an old fellow in this parish that very gravely takes off his bonnet as often as he sings " Duan Dearmot." I was extremely fond to try if the case was so, and getting him to my house I gave him a bottle of ale, and begged the favour of him to sing " Duan Dearmot ; " after some nicety he told me that to oblige his parish minister he would do so, but to my surprise he took off his bonnet. I caused him stop, and would put on his bonnet ; he made some excuses ; however, as soon as he began, he...

Bibliographic information