Aristotle and the Arabic Tradition

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Ahmed Alwishah, Josh Hayes
Cambridge University Press, Sep 17, 2015 - History - 266 pages
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This volume of essays by scholars in ancient Greek, medieval, and Arabic philosophy examines the full range of Aristotle's influence upon the Arabic tradition. It explores central themes from Aristotle's corpus, including logic, rhetoric and poetics, physics and meteorology, psychology, metaphysics, ethics and politics, and examines how these themes are investigated and developed by Arabic philosophers including al-Kind, al-Frb, Avicenna, al-Ghazl, Ibn Bjja and Averroes. The volume also includes essays which explicitly focus upon the historical reception of Aristotle, from the time of the Greek and Syriac transmission of his texts into the Islamic world to the period of their integration and assimilation into Arabic philosophy. This rich and wide-ranging collection will appeal to all those who are interested in the themes, development and context of Aristotle's enduring legacy within the Arabic tradition.
 

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Contents

Arisṭū ʿindalʿArab and beyond
11
The division of the categories according to Avicenna
30
What if that is why? Avicennas taxonomy of scientific
50
The Rhetoric and Poetics in the Islamic world
76
AlFārābī and the Didascalia
92
Aristotles physical works and the Arabic tradition
105
from Aristotle to Philoponus to Avicenna
121
Avicenna on selfcognition and selfawareness
143
Averroes on intentionality and the human experience
164
Metaphysics in the orbit of Islam
177
The Arabic reception of the Nicomachean Ethics
200
notes on politics and solitude
214
References
234
Index
261
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About the author (2015)

Ahmed Alwishah is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Pitzer College, Claremont. He has translated the Arabic testimonial of Thales jointly with Richard McKirahan in Thales (2014).

Josh Hayes is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Alvernia University, Pennsylvania. His research focuses upon Aristotle and the history of Aristotelian commentary.