The history of the reign of George III to the termination of the late war: to which is prefixed a view of the progressive improvement of England, in prosperity and strength, to the accession of his Majesty, Volume 1

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Packard, 1816 - Great Britain
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Page 561 - I rejoice that the grave has not closed upon me; that I am still alive to lift up my voice against the dismemberment of this ancient and most noble monarchy! Pressed down as I am by the hand of infirmity, I am little able to assist my country in this most perilous conjuncture; but, my Lords, while I have sense and memory, I will never consent to deprive the royal offspring of the House of Brunswick, the heirs of the Princess Sophia, of their fairest inheritance.
Page 415 - The question with me is, not whether you have a right to render your people miserable, but whether it is not your interest to make them happy.
Page 309 - With this view, I have always been " careful, as well to execute faithfully the trust reposed in " me, as to avoid even the appearance of invading any of " those powers which the constitution has placed in other
Page 194 - Duke of Cornwall and Rothsay, Earl of Carrick, Baron of Renfrew, Lord of the Isles, and Great Steward of Scotland, Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester.
Page 410 - The act to restrain the trade and commerce of the provinces of Massachusetts Bay and New Hampshire, and colonies of Connecticut and Rhode Island and Providence Plantation, in North America, to Great Britain, Ireland, and the British Islands in the West Indies ; and to prohibit such provinces and colonies from carrying on any fishery on the banks of Newfoundland...
Page 556 - An Act for removing all doubts and apprehensions concerning taxation by the Parliament of Great Britain, in any of the colonies, provinces, and plantations in North America, and the West Indies; and for repealing so much of an Act, made in the seventh year of the reign of His present Majesty, as imposes a duty on tea imported from Great Britain into any colony or plantation in America, or relates thereto...
Page 390 - That your majesty may enjoy every felicity through a long and glorious reign, over loyal and happy subjects, and that your descendants may inherit your prosperity and dominions till time shall be no more, is, and always will be, our sincere and fervent prayer.
Page 626 - ... they might, indeed, be reduced to two or three simple maxims ; but they would be too general, and their application to the several heads of the business before us would not be so distinct and visible. I conceive, then, First, That all jurisdictions which furnish more matter of expense, more temptation to oppression, or more means and instruments of corrupt influence, than advantage to justice or political administration, ought to be abolished.
Page 561 - I am not, I confess, well informed of the resources of this kingdom, but I trust it has still sufficient to maintain its just rights, though I know them not. Any state, my lords, is better than despair. Let us at least make one effort, and if we must fall, let us fall like men.
Page 360 - ... dependence of the colonies upon the crown and parliament of Great Britain.

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