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Books Books 1 - 10 of 12 on The muscular powers are, all along, much affected: this, indeed, happens before any....
" The muscular powers are, all along, much affected: this, indeed, happens before any great change takes place in the mind, and goes on progressively increasing. He can no longer walk with steadiness, but totters from side to side. The limbs become powerless,... "
The Anatomy of Drunkenness - Page 22
by Robert Macnish - 1835 - 227 pages
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 23

1828
...any deficiency in this respect ; and, while exciting mirth by his eccentric motions, imagines that be walks with the most perfect steadiness. In attempting...passes over the ground with astonishing rapidity. The last stage of drunkenness is total insensibility. The man tumbles perhaps beneath the tabl«, and...
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The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Volume 9

Reuben Percy, John Timbs - 1828
...stages the speech is thick, and the use of the tongue in a great measure lost ; his mouth is half-open and idiotic in the expression, while his eyes are...passes over the ground with astonishing rapidity. The last stage of drunkenness is total insensibility. The man tumbles, peihaps, beneath the table,...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 23

England - 1828
...ridiculously profuse with his apologies. Frequently he mistakes one person for another, and imagines some of those before him are individuals who are in...steadiness. In attempting to run, he conceives that he pasees over the ground with astonishing Drunkennei». QApril, rapidity. The last stage of drunkenness...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 23

1828
...any deficiency in this respect ; and, while exciting mirth by his eccentric motions, imagines that be walks with the most perfect steadiness. In attempting to run, he conceives that he pasiei over the ground with astonishing is total insensibility. The man tumbles perhaps beneath the...
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The Southern Review, Volume 5

1830
...sustain his weight. He is however not always sensible of any deficiency in this respect, and whilst exciting mirth by his eccentric motions, imagines...most perfect steadiness. In attempting to run, he thinks he hops over the ground with astonishing rapidity. The last stage of drunkenness is total insensibility...
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Southern Review, Volume 5

1830
...sustain his weight. He is however not always sensible of any deficiency in this respect, and whilst exciting mirth by his eccentric motions, imagines that he walks with the most perfect •teadiness. In attempting to run, he thinks he hops over the ground with astonishing rapidity. The...
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"Curiosities of Literature

Isaac Disraeli - 1835
...place in the mind, and goes on progressively increasing. He c?n no longer walk with steadiness, hut totters from side to side. The limbs become powerless,...trees and steeples nod like tipsy Bacchanals ; and the Tery earth seems to slip from under his feet, and leave him walking and floundering upon the air. The...
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Curiosities of Medical Experience

John Gideon Millingen - Medicine - 1839 - 566 pages
...however, not always sensible of any deficiency in this respect, and while exciting mirth by his cccentiic motions, imagines that he walks with the most perfect...In attempting to run, he conceives that he passes the ground with astonishing rapidity. In his distorted eyes all men and even inanimate nature itself,...
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The Constitution of Man

George Combe - Human beings - 1845 - 382 pages
...of any deficiency in this respect : and while exciting mirth by his eccentric motions, imagines tbat he walks with the most perfect steadiness. In attempting...seem to be drunken, while he alone is sober. Houses icel from side to side as if they hid lost their balance ; trees and steeples nod like tipsy Bacchanals...
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THE CONSTITUTION OF MAN.

GEORGE COMBE - 1850
...before any great change takes place in the mind, and goes on progressively increasing. He c?n no Conger walk with steadiness, but totters from side to side....seem to be drunken, while he alone is sober. Houses icel from side to side as if they had lost their balance ; trees and steeples nod like tipsy Bacchanals...
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