Labor, Law and Justice: A Treatise on Workmen's Compensation

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Bulletin publishing Company, 1912 - Employers' liability - 132 pages
 

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Page 127 - ... and because this necessarily embraces a vast variety of particulars, which are susceptible neither of specification nor of definition. It is therefore of necessity left to the discretion of the national legislature, to pronounce upon the objects, which concern the " general welfare," and for which, under that description, an appropriation of money is requisite and proper.
Page 126 - They are not to lay taxes ad libitum for any purpose they please but only to pay the debts or provide for the welfare of the Union. In like manner, they are not to do anything they please to provide for the general welfare but only to lay taxes for that purpose.
Page 7 - If circumstances lead me, I will find Where truth is hid, though it were hid indeed Within the centre.
Page 98 - That all men, when they form a social compact, are equal in rights; and that no man or set of men are entitled to exclusive public emoluments or privileges from the community.
Page 21 - When an eighteenth century Constitution forms the charter of liberty of a twentieth century government, must its general provisions be construed and interpreted by an eighteenth century mind in the light of eighteenth century conditions and ideals? Clearly not. This were to command the race to halt in its progress, to stretch the state upon a veritable bed of Procrustes.
Page 126 - to lay taxes for the purpose of providing for the general welfare;" for the laying of taxes is the power, and the general welfare the purpose for which the power is to be exercised. Congress are not to lay taxes ad libitum for any purpose they please; but only to pay the debts or provide for the welfare of the Union. In like manner, they are not to do anything they please to, provide for the general welfare, but only to lay taxes for that purpose. To consider the latter phrase, not as describing...
Page 127 - Since, as pointed out in all the decisions referred to, the taxing power conferred by the Constitution knows no limits except those expressly stated in that instrument...
Page 70 - Indeed, it is a strange-disposed time ; But men may construe things after their fashion, Clean from the purpose of the things themselves.
Page 41 - Every manufacturer has a right to choose the machinery to be used in his business, and to control that business in the manner most agreeable to himself, provided he does not thereby violate the law of the land. He may select his appliances, and run his mill with old or new machinery, just as he may ride in an old or new carriage, navigate an old or new vessel, occupy an old or new house, as he pleases.
Page 107 - Purpose is but the slave to memory, Of violent birth but poor validity, Which now like fruit unripe sticks on the tree, But fall unshaken when they mellow be.

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