Modern Britain, 1750 to the Present

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 20, 2017 - History - 561 pages
"War and the reach of the state. After the Revolution of 1688/9 the first job of the fledgling state was to survive. The post- revolutionary settlement sought to address the outstanding constitutional causes of the conflict with the Bill of Rights (1689) and the Acts of Toleration (1689) and Settlement (1701). The Bill of Rights helped establish a new type of constitutional monarchy unable to raise armies or taxes and unable to interfere in the conduct of law or parliamentary procedures and elections. Together with the Act of Settlement in 1701 it also enshrined the protestant nature of the monarchy, barring Catholics to that office and ensuring that the throne would pass to Mary's heirs and then only to James' heirs who had married in to the Protestant German House of Hanover. Parliament, not the hereditary principle of the monarchy, determined the issue of succession--a truly revolutionary principle in a dynastic Europe ruled by monarchs who claimed (if rarely practiced) absolute power. John Locke's Two Treatises on Government (1689) theorized that this new contract between parliament and the monarchy endowed Englishmen with certain minimal rights and rested the legitimacy of government on their shoulders. The leading philosopher and political theorist of the age, Locke argued that the legitimacy of government rested in its ability to represent the people with whom sovereignty lay. Finally, the Act of Toleration (1689) allowed freedom of worship to both dissenting and non-conformist Protestants (those who chose not to join the congregation of the state's Church of England), but specifically excluded Catholics. All these groups remained barred from holding public office or being educated at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge"--
 

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Contents

2
40
3
75
4
113
5
150
6
191
7
229
8
268
9
307
Hot and Cold Wars
409
Decolonization
417
Conclusion
428
Affluence and its Limits
434
Commonwealth Citizens and the Colour of Class
441
A Generation in Revolt
447
The Rise of Identity Politics
457
Conclusion
467

Late Imperialism and Social Democracy
353
Planning and the Science of Government
362
States of Warfare and Welfare
368
Managing Affluence and Consensus
380
Conclusion
390
Timeline
397
The Neoliberal Revolution and the Making of Homo Economicus
475
Wealth Debt and Poverty
491
The Security State
497
Conclusion
514
Index
538
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About the author (2017)

James Vernon is Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Politics and the People (1993), Hunger: A Modern History (2007) and Distant Strangers: How Britain Became Modern (2014), and the editor of Rereading the Constitution (1996), The Peculiarities of Liberal Modernity in Imperial Britain (2011) and the Berkeley Series in British Studies. He is also on the editorial boards of Social History, Twentieth Century British History, and the Journal of British Studies.

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