Armenia Christiana: Armenian Religious Identity and the Churches of Constantinople and Rome (4th–15th Century)

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Wydawnictwo UJ, Dec 16, 2016 - Armenia - 374 pages
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This book presents the dramatic and complex story of Armenia's ecclesiastical relations with Byzantine and subsequently Roman Christendom in the Middle Ages. It is built on a broad foundation of sources – Armenian, Greek, Latin, and Syrian chronicles and documents, especially the abundant correspondence between the Holy See and the Armenian Church. Krzysztof Stopka examines problems straddling the disciplines of history and theology and pertinent to a critical, though not widely known, episode in the story of the struggle for Christian unity.

 

 

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Contents

List of abbreviations
9
The origins of Armenian Christianity
17
Armenia in the community of the Universal Church
35
The road to religious and national independence
54
Under pressure of Constantinople
77
Relations between Armenians and the Patriarchate of Rome
100
Between Constantinople and Rome 12th century
110
Under the long shadow of Rome
143
Catholic missions in Greater Armenia
204
From Uniate Church to Catholic Church
221
Caught between union and policy
244
Armenians in the Latin Church in the Near East
271
The Union of Florence 1439
291
Concluding remarks
309
Bibliography
319
Index
343

Under the Mongol Protectorate second half of the 13th century
157
Latinisation of the rite
193

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About the author (2016)

Krzysztof Stopka is a Cracovian specialist in medieval history. He is head of the department of the history of culture and the teaching of history at the Jagiellonian University, and also director of the Jagiellonian University Museum. His work on Armenian issues includes Polish-language books on the Armenian Church in the East European diaspora in the Middle Ages and the history of the Armenians in Poland, showing their contribution to Polish culture. He is co-author of Ormianska Warszawa (2013), a book on the Armenians of Warsaw, which was awarded a top prize in the Clio Contest, the main Polish competition for books on history.

 

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