Evidences of the Christian Religion With Additional Discourses on the Being and Attributes of God and the Other Important Doctrines of Natural and Revealed Religion

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Kessinger Publishing, Jul 1, 2003 - Religion - 316 pages
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The character of Mr. Addison and his writings, for justness of thought, strength of reasoning and purity of style, is too well established to need a recommendation. Their greatest ornament, and that which gives a luster to all the rest, is his appearing throughout, a zealous advocate for virtue and religion against profaneness and infidelity. Due to the age and scarcity of the original we reproduced, some pages may be spotty, faded or difficult to read. Written in Old English.

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About the author (2003)

Addison, son of the Dean of Litchfield, took high honors at Oxford University and then joined the British army. He first came to literary fame by writing a poem, "The Campaign" (1704), to celebrate the Battle of Blenheim. When Richard Steele, whom he had known in his public school Charterhouse, started The Tatler in 1709, Addison became a regular contributor. But his contributions to a later venture The Spectator (generally considered the zenith of the periodical essay), were fundamental. While Steele can be credited with the editorial direction of the journal, Addison's essays, ranging from gently satiric to genuinely funny, secured the journal's success. In The Spectator, No. 10, Addison declared that the journal aimed "to enliven morality with wit, and to temper wit with morality." His brilliant character of Sir Roger de Coverley (followed from rake to reformation) distinguishes the most popular essays. Addison died in 1719. He is buried in Westminster Abbey.

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