Nuclear Weapons, Scientists, and the Post-Cold War Challenge: Selected Papers on Arms Control

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World Scientific, 2007 - Political Science - 323 pages
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This volume includes a representative selection of Sidney Drell''s recent writings and speeches (circa 1993 to the present) on public policy issues with substantial scientific components. Most of the writings deal with national security, nuclear weapons, and arms control and reflect the authorOCOs personal involvement in such issues dating back to 1960. Fifteen years after the demise of the Soviet Union, the gravest danger presented by nuclear weapons is the spread of advanced technology that may result in the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Of most concern would be their acquisition by hostile governments and terrorists who are unconstrained by accepted norms of civilized behavior. The current challenges are to prevent this from happening and, at the same time, to pursue aggressively the opportunity to escape from an outdated nuclear deterrence trap."
 

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Contents

My Involvement as a Scientist Working on Issues of National Security and Views on Scientists Responsibilities and Ethical Dilemmas
5
Reflections
7
Physics and US National Security
17
The Moral Obligation of Scientists and a Rekindling of Hope
28
Response on Behalf of Degree Recipients at the University of Tel Aviv Ceremony Granting Honorary Doctors Degrees
34
Response at the Ceremony Awarding the William Oliver Baker Award
36
Recollections of the Pioneers and Founders of National Reconnaissance
38
The Impact of a Public Constituency
45
This Treaty Must Be Ratified
125
Technical Issues of a Nuclear Test Ban
126
Merits and Risks of More Underground Tests
169
Safety in High Consequence Operations
171
The Route to the CTBT
189
The Present Threat
197
New Challenges in the 21st Century Escaping the Nuclear Deterrence Trap and Facing Terrorism
205
The Gravest Danger
207

The Troubled Frontier
51
To Act or Not To Act
65
Issues Coming to the Fore Immediately Following the Collapse of the Soviet Union and the End of the Cold War
67
Science and National Security
68
Testimony on the Future of Arms Control
76
Abolishing Longrange Nuclear Missiles
89
Reducing Nuclear Danger
91
At the End of the 20th Century The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty and the Emergence of the New Terror of Biological and Chemical Weapons
107
Adlai Stevenson and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty of Today
109
On Stockpile Stewardship and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty
113
Putting the Nuclear Genie Back in the Bottle
118
Reasons To Ratify Not To Stall
124
The Gravest Danger
213
Tough Challenges
231
What Are Nuclear Weapons For Recommendations for Restructuring US Strategic Nuclear Forces?
235
In the Shadow of the Bomb
270
Memorials to Four Colleagues who were Great Scientists and Citizens
277
Statesman of Science
278
A Passionate Leader for International Cooperation in Science and in the Pursuit of Peace
286
Shaping Public Policy
294
Report on the Progress in Reducing Nuclear Danger Presented at an International Conference in Honor of Andrei Sakharov
303
Andrei Sakharov and the Nuclear Danger
317
What Are Nuclear Weapons For?
323
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About the author (2007)

Sidney David Drell was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey on September 13, 1926. He received a bachelor's degree in physics in 1946 from Princeton University and a master's degree in physics in 1947 and a doctorate in physics in 1949 from the University of Illinois. After teaching at Stanford University for two years, he joined the physics department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He left in 1956 to work at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. He was the deputy director there for almost 30 years. He was one of the top advisers to the United States government on military technology and arms control. He received the Enrico Fermi Award for his life's work in 2000 and the National Medal of Science for his contributions to physics and his service to the government in 2013. He wrote numerous books during his lifetime including Electromagnetic Structure of Nucleons, Facing the Threat of Nuclear Weapons, The Reagan Strategic Defense Initiative: A Technical, Political and Arms Control Assessment, In the Shadow of the Bomb: Physics and Arms Control, and The Gravest Danger: Nuclear Weapons. He co-wrote several textbooks with the theoretical physicist James D. Bjorken including Relativistic Quantum Mechanics and Relativistic Quantum Fields. He died on December 21, 2016 at the age of 90.

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