The Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 2

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jul 28, 1999 - History - 754 pages
6 Reviews
This volume provides the most comprehensive treatment of the Heian period, the golden age of the Japanese imperial court, in any Western language. From Heian-kyo, founded in 794, the Japanese emperor ruled over an elaborate government modelled on China's absolute monarchy. Ambassadors to the T'ang court and students studying in China brought back laws, ideas, Buddhism, temple architecture, sculpture, and wall-painting. Chinese influences blended with native Japanese elements in courtly painting, calligraphy, poetry and prose. The world's first novel, The Tale of Genji, was completed about 1020. In 1185 the elegant and peaceful world of the court was shattered by the struggle of the Taira and Minamoto warrior clans, who usurped real political power and left the emperor with a symbolic, legitimizing role. Contributors to this volume emphasize political history, the land system, provincial administration, the capital and its society, aristocratic culture, and the acceptance of Buddhism and popular religious practices.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
0
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
1

Review: The Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 1: Ancient Japan (The Cambridge History of Japan #1)

User Review  - Dumitru Condrea - Goodreads

A brilliant tome on the ancient history of Japan, especially for those who only have a vague idea about it. The chapter about the earliest societies of Japan is, of course, a heavy read compared to ... Read full review

Review: The Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 1: Ancient Japan (The Cambridge History of Japan #1)

User Review  - Goodreads

A brilliant tome on the ancient history of Japan, especially for those who only have a vague idea about it. The chapter about the earliest societies of Japan is, of course, a heavy read compared to ... Read full review

Contents

The Heian court 7941070
20
Evolution of the statutory government
37
The Fujiwara regency 9701070
64
Foreign relations 7941070
80
The capital and its society
97
Emperors Residential Compound
113
Land and society
183
Peasant community
194
Calligraphy and paper
415
Music
424
Poetry
431
Narrative prose
441
Aristocratic Buddhism
449
Saicho
462
Kukai
473
The Shingon school after Kukai
497

Landholding
215
Shoen
224
Provincial administration and land tenure in early Heian
236
Regional administration
254
The establishment of custodial governorship
265
Land and taxes
272
The surrender of central control to provincial
283
Discretionary taxation and elite wealth
298
Local elites as a political force
326
Chinese learning and intellectual life
341
Ideal of the sageking
355
Compilation of statutes
364
Scholars and their accomplishments
375
Aristocratic culture
390
Diet
398
Secular painting
409
The growth of Pure Land Buddhism
507
Religious practices
517
Ritualized and ritualizing activities
532
Dealing with the forces of nature
547
The association of kami with buddhas
564
Late Heian developments
572
The rise of the warriors
644
Revolts of Masakado and Sumitomo
653
Revolt of Tadatsune
664
Earlier Nine YearsWar
670
Conditions in the capital
679
Hdgen Disturbance
688
Taira rise to power
695
Works cited
711
Glossaryindex
741
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information