Eugene Onegin : A Novel in Verse: A Novel in Verse

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Oxford University Press, UK, Sep 10, 1998 - Fiction - 288 pages
Eugene Onegin is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard as the fountainhead of their literature. Set in 1820s Russia, Pushkin's novel in verse follows the fates of three men and three women. It was Pushkin's own favourite work, and this new translation conveys the literal sense and the poetic music of the original. - ;Eugene Onegin is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard as the fountainhead of their literature. Set in 1820s imperial Russia, Pushkin's novel in verse follows the emotions and destiny of three men - Onegin the bored fop, Lensky the minor elegiast, and a stylized Pushkin himself - and the fates and affections of three women - Tatyana the provincial beauty, her sister Olga, and Pushkin's mercurial Muse. Engaging, full of suspense, and varied in tone, it also portrays a large cast of other characters and offers the reader many literary, philosophical, and autobiographical digressions, often in a highly satirical vein. Eugene Onegin was Pushkin's own favourite work, and it shows him attempting to transform himself from a romantic poet into a realistic novelist. This new translation seeks to retain both the literal sense and the poetic music of the original, and capture the poem's spontaneity and wit. The introduction examines several ways of reading the novel, and text is richly annotated. -

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I read this after purchasing tickets for the opera and reading Seth's "The Golden Gate," which was inspired by this Russian novel in verse. While I really enjoyed this translation, I did not find it as enjoyable as Seth's novel; I don't know much about imperialist Russia and found the translation to be difficult to follow at times. Despite this, I think Falen did a wonderful job of translating the novel for us English speakers who don't know a word of Russian. He managed to convey both the plot and the "Onegin Stanza" well. I would reccommend this novel to those who have read The Golden Gate and those who have an appreciation for Russian Literature. 

Review: Eugene Onegin

User Review  - Mary Ronan Drew - Goodreads

Not for me. I gave up and returned the book to the library. Perhaps another time. My database tells me I read it about 35 years ago. I remember nothink. Read full review

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About the author (1998)

James E. Falen is Professor of Russian at the University of Tennessee.

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