The Life of Jacob Henle

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Medical Life Company, 1921 - Physicians - 117 pages
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Page 54 - ... he knew more by direct personal observation of the microscopic structure of animals than any one else who has ever lived." He was one of the greatest histologists of all time, and one of the chief creators of its modern phase.
Page 113 - An hypothesis which becomes dispossessed by new facts, dies an honorable death; and if it has already called up for examination those truths by which it was annihilated, it deserves a monument of gratitude...
Page 13 - The male is therefore, as it were, a mere afterthought of nature. Moreover, the male sex was at first and for a long period, and still throughout many of the lower orders of beings, devoted exclusively to the function for which it was created, viz., that of fertilization.
Page 115 - Henle's fibrin; the remains of the gubernaculum surrounding the vas deferens and vessels of the spermatic cord, known as Henle's internal cremaster; and the striated muscular fibres encircling the prostatic and membranous urethra, known as Henle's sphincter. But his most interesting find in this field was the U-shaped turn of the uriniferous tubule which is formed by a descending and an ascending loop-tube, known everywhere as Henle's loop. Concerning this discovery, the fortunate Henle wrote one...
Page 13 - ... step down an inch" throughout the history of civilization. That so very recently, indeed in his biological yesterday, he had counted for so little in this world he had forgotten over night, as it were. That ". . . . the male sex was at first and for a long period, and still throughout many of the lower orders of being, is devoted exclusively to the function for which it was created, viz., that of fertilization," that "among millions of humble creatures the male is simply and solely a fertilizer"...
Page 103 - His work on epithelial tissue was especially important and led him to make the generalization (1838) that "all free surfaces of the body, and all the inner surfaces of its tubes and canals, and all the walls of its cavities, are lined with epithelium." Later he showed the presence of smooth muscle in the middle coat of the smaller arteries and described a portion of the kidney tubule that is now known as Henle's loop. In 1840, Henle pointed out that communicable diseases, such as cholera and influenza...
Page 106 - Contagia," which laid the foundation of the germ-theory of disease, as it contains the first clear statement, in modern terms, that infectious diseases are due to specific microorganisms. Henle said that if these organisms are invisible, it is not because of their extraordinary smallness, but because they differ so little from the tissues in which they are imbedded, that they remain unrecognizable. The predictions which Henle made in 1840 were fulfilled, more than forty years afterward, by his pupil,...
Page 54 - Leeuvvenhoek described the spermatozoa, but it was left for Kolliker to explain their true development, and he again recalled Leeuwenhoek when he increased our knowledge of the branched muscle plates of the heart which had first been seen by the Delft microscopist. Kolliker extended Corti's discoveries in the histology of the ear, and was the first to supply a satisfactory description of the fibrous layer of the substantia propria of the iris. Kolliker's proof that nerve-fibers are continuous with...
Page 55 - Kb'lliker built temples of science where succeeding generations shall dwell. The only time a professor feels really independent is when he receives a call from another university, and when Henle was invited to Tubingen it was a signal for another ultimatum, although on this occasion his demands were more on behalf of his colleagues than for his own department. Zurich, which had lost...

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