Thrilling Days in Army Life

Front Cover
Harper & brothers, 1900 - Apache Indians - 194 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
3
II
79
III
125

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 66 - Cheyennes numbered 450 or more. Mr. Grover says they never fought so before. They were splendidly armed with Spencer and Henry rifles. We killed at least thirty-five of them, and wounded many more, besides killing and wounding a quantity of their stock. They carried off most of their killed during the night, but three of their men fell into our hands. I am on a little island, and have still plenty of ammunition left. We are living on mule and horse meat, and are entirely out of rations. If it was...
Page 128 - Grant wishes a position taken far enough south to serve as a base for further operations upon Gordonsville and Charlottesville. It must be strongly fortified and provisioned. Some point in the vicinity of Manassas gap would seem best suited for all purposes. Colonel Alexander, of the engineers, will be sent to consult with you as soon as you connect with General Augur.
Page 131 - GENERAL : I enclose you despatch which explains itself. [See copy following.] If the enemy should be strongly re-enforced in cavalry, he might, by turning our right, give us a great deal of trouble. I shall hold on here until the enemy's movements are developed, and shall only fear an attack on my right, which I shall make every preparation for guarding against and resisting.
Page 46 - I'm hit," his head at the same time falling forward on the sand. Crawling to him, I pulled his body down into the pit and turned him upon his back, but I saw at once that there was no hope. A bullet had entered his forehead just over the eye, and the wound was mortal. He never spoke another rational word, but lingered nearly three days before dying.
Page 131 - Be ready to move as soon as my forces join you, and we will crush Sheridan.
Page 128 - If any advance is to be made on Gordonsville and Charlottesville, it is not best to send troops away from my command, and I have therefore countermanded the order directing the Sixth Corps to march to Alexandria.
Page 132 - GENERAL : The cavalry is all ordered back to you ; make your position strong. If Longstreet's despatch is true, he is under the impression that we have largely detached. I will go over to Augur, and may get additional news. Close in Colonel Powell, who will be at this point. If the enemy should make an advance, I know you will defeat him. Look well to your ground and be well prepared. Get up everything that can be spared. I will bring up all I can, and will be up on Tuesday, if not sooner. "PH...
Page 65 - I sent you two messengers on the night of the 17th instant, informing you of my critical condition. I tried to send two more last night, but they did not succeed in passing the Indian pickets, and returned. If the others have not arrived, then hasten at once to my assistance. I have eight badly wounded and ten slightly wounded men to take in, and every animal I had was killed save seven which the Indians stampeded. Lieutenant Beecher is dead, and Acting Assistant Surgeon Mooers probably cannot live...
Page 55 - In a few moments I heard him murmur 'My poor mother,' and then he soon grew slightly delirious and at times I could hear him talking in a semi-unconscious manner about the fight ; but he was never again fully conscious, and at sunset his life went out. And thus perished one of the best and bravest officers in the United States Army.
Page 66 - Cheyennes alone numbered 450, or more. Mr. Grover says they never fought so before. They were splendidly armed with Spencer and Henry rifles. We killed at least thirty-five of them, and wounded many more, besides killing and wounding a quantity of their stock. They carried off most of their killed during the night, but three of their men fell into our hands. I am on a little island, and have still plenty of ammunition left. We are living on mule and horse-meat, and are entirely out of rations.

Bibliographic information