An Introduction to Native North America -- Pearson eText

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Routledge, Aug 26, 2015 - History - 432 pages
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An Introduction to Native North America provides a basic introduction to the native peoples of North America, including both the United States and Canada. It covers the history of research, basic prehistory, the European invasion and the impact of Europeans on Native cultures. Additionally, much of the book is written from the perspective of the ethnographic present, and the various cultures are described as they were at the specific times noted in the text.

Teaching and Learning Experiences:

Improve Critical Thinking - An Introduction to Native North America provides internet resources for students to supplement reading material, and contains an extensive bibliography to aid in their research.

Engage Students - An Introduction to Native North America highlights important individuals in "VIP Profile" mini-biographies, and contains "Sidelights" throughout the text which provides short explanations of interesting aspects of native culture.

Support Instructors - Teaching your course just got easier! You can create a Customized Text or use our Instructor's Manual, Electronic "MyTest" Test Bank or PowerPoint Presentation Slides. Plus, An Introduction to Native North America's organization was designed to be used in conjunction with the Handbook of North American Indians, published by the Smithsonian Institution.

 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 European Invasion
25
3 Native Peoples of the Arctic
46
4 Native Peoples of the Subarctic
81
5 Native Peoples of the Plateau
100
6 Native Peoples of the Northwest Coast
119
7 Native Peoples of the Great Basin
143
8 Native Peoples of California
166
10 Native Peoples of the Plains
239
11 Native Peoples of the Northeast
274
12 Native Peoples of the Southeast
307
13 Contemporary Issues
339
Glossary
355
References and Suggested Readings
358
Index
380
Copyright

9 Native Peoples of the Southwest
189

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About the author (2015)

Mark Q. Sutton began his career in anthropology in 1968. While still in high school, he took advantage of the opportunity to participate in archaeological excavations conducted by the local Community College. He went on to earn a BA (1972), an MA (1977), and a Ph.D (1987) in anthropology. He has worked as an archaeologist for the US Air Force, the US Bureau of Land Management, various private consulting firms, and taught at a number of community colleges and universities. He taught at California State University, Bakersfield from 1987 to 2007 where he retired as Emeritus Professor of Anthropology. He now works for Statistical Research, Inc. in San Diego. Dr. Sutton works on understanding hunter-gatherer adaptations to arid environments but has also investigated entomophagy, prehistoric diet and technology, and optimal foraging theory. Dr. Sutton has worked at more than 120 sites in North America and has published over 160 books, monographs, and papers on archaeology and anthropology.

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