Instructions to military cooks in the preparation of dinners at the instructional kitchen, Aldershot

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H.M. Stationery Office, 1878 - Cooking for military personnel - 55 pages
 

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Page 36 - J-inch thick, rub them with the salt, pepper, and flour, and place the meat in the boiler with some fat, brown it on both sides, then add the onions whole, and then the potatoes, and enough water to cover the potatoes; stew gently for two hours, keep the fire down and well covered during the cooking.
Page 36 - Cut the meat away from the bone, and then into pieces of one-quarter pound each ; if a loin or neck of mutton, cut it into chops; if a shoulder disjoint it, and cut the blade bone into four pieces ; if a leg, cut the meat into slices...
Page 14 - The flesh of a bull-calf is more red and firm than that of a cow-calf, and the fat more hard curdled. MUTTON. If it be young, the flesh will pinch tender; if old, it will wrinkle and remain so: if young, the fat will easily part from the lean; if old, it will stick by strings and skins: if...
Page 22 - ... of green and black teas are due to the mode in which the leaves are treated. For green teas, the leaves are roasted in pans almost immediately after they are gathered. After about five minutes...
Page 22 - T black teas, the leaves are allowed to be spread out in the air for some time after they are gathered ; they are then further tossed about till they become flaccid ; they are next roasted for a few minutes, and rolled, after which they are exposed to the air for a few hours in a soft and moist state ; and lastly, they are dried slowly over charcoal fires, till the black color is fairly brought out.
Page 23 - England, because it is said to lose flavor by the sea-voyage. Much is, however, sent overland to Russia, where it fetches an exorbitant price. The ordinary picking begins just after the summer rains are over, at the beginning of May; and later in the season, a third picking takes place, the produce of which is inferior, and used only by the poorer classes of the country. The later gatherings are more bitter and woody than the earlier, and yield less soluble matter to water.
Page 26 - ... of the fat, and chop it up, slice the onions, put the fat in the boiler ; when melted, add the onions, stir them well, so that they do not get brown ; In five minutes add the meat, which keep stirring and turning over for five minutes longer : the...
Page 22 - It is sufficient here to remark, first, that, in the process of drying, the leaves are roasted and scorched in such a way as necessarily to induce many chemical changes in them ; the result of such changes being to produce the varieties of flavor, odor, and taste by which the different kinds of teas are distinguished; and secondly, that the different colors of green and black teas are due to the mode in which.
Page 26 - ... put the fat in the boiler; when melted, add the onions, stir them well, so that they do not get brown ; in five minutes add the meat, which keep stirring and turning over for five minutes longer; the meat ought to be warm through; then add the boiling water by degrees , let it simmer gently for one hour, mix the flour with cold water very smooth, add it to the soup, with the salt, pepper, sugar, and herbs; simmer gently for thirty minutes , keep stirring it to prevent the flour from settling...
Page 22 - After about five minutes' roasting, during which they make a cracking noise, become moist and flaccid, and give out a. good deal of vapour, they are placed on the rollingtable, and rolled with the hands. They are then returned to the pans, and kept in motion by the hands : in about an hour, or rather more, they are well dried, and their colour, which is a dull green, but becomes brighter afterwards, has become fixed.

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