The Making of Americans: Being a History of a Family's Progress

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Dalkey Archive Press, 1995 - Fiction - 925 pages
21 Reviews

In "The Making of Americans," Gertrude Stein sets out to tell "a history of a family's progress," radically reworking the traditional family saga novel to encompass her vision of personality and psychological relationships. As the history progresses over three generations, Stein also meditates on her own writing, on the making of "The Making of Americans," and on America.

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Review: The Making of Americans

User Review  - Susan - Goodreads

I couldn't do it. I have broken on the rocks of Gertrude Stein. I can see what she is attempting, and I think it's interesting. But I can't do it for 900 pages. I concede. Read full review

Review: The Making of Americans

User Review  - Erika - Goodreads

YYYYEEEESSSS!!!! I've finally finished it!! I get it. I really do. She constantly repeats EVERY WORD to represent life repeating itself but it's sooooooooooooooooooo boring!!! And at 925 pages long it's been a hard struggle. Read full review

Contents

The Dehnings and the Herslands
3
The Hersland Parents
33
Mrs Hersland and the Hersland Children
150
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About the author (1995)

Famous writer Gertrude Stein was born on February 3, 1874 in Allegheny, PA and was educated at Radcliffe College and Johns Hopkins medical school. Stein wrote Three Lives, The Making of Americans, and Tender Buttons, all of which were considered difficult for the average reader. She is most famous for her opera Four Saints in Three Acts and The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, which was actually an autobiography of Stein herself. With her companion Alice B. Toklas, Stein received the French government's Medaille de la Reconnaissance Francaise for theory work with the American fund for French Wounded in World War I. Gertrude Stein died in Neuilly-ser-Seine, France on July 27, 1946.

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