The White Mountains: A Handbook for Travellers : a Guide to the Peaks, Passes, and Ravines of the White Mountains of New Hampshire ....

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J.R. Osgood, 1882 - White Mountains (N.H. and Me.) - 436 pages
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Page 240 - Hill till you come to the top, which will require half a days time, and yet it is not above a Mile, where there is also a Level of about an Acre of ground, with a pond of clear water in the midst of it; which you may hear run down, but how it ascends is a mystery.
Page 146 - The stream fell from a height of 240 or 250 feet over three precipices, the second receding a small distance from the front of the first, and the third from that of the second. Down the first and second, it fell in a single current, and down the third in three, which united their streams at the bottom in a fine basin formed by the hand of nature in the rocks immediately beneath us. It is impossible for a brook of this size to be...
Page 443 - For sale by all Booksellers. Sent, post-paid, on receipt of price by the Publishers, JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO,, Boston.
Page 344 - ... form, wind-beaten, thunder-scarred. They linger tenderly, and fain would stay, Since he, earth-rooted, may not float away. He upward looks, but moves not ; wears their hues ; Draws them unto himself; their beauty shares; And sometimes his own semblance seems to lose, His grandeur and their grace so interfuse ; And when his angels leave him unawares, A sullen rock, his brow to heaven he bares.
Page 263 - Face," that hangs upon one of its highest cliffs. If its inclosing walls were less grand, and its water gems less lovely, travellers would be still, perhaps, as strongly attracted to the spot, that they might see a mountain which breaks into human expression, — a piece of sculpture older than the Sphynx, — an intimation of the human countenance, which is the crown of all beauty, that was- pushed out from the coarse strata of New England thousands of years before Adam. The...
Page 346 - Hidden was ordained on a large rock, (20 feet by 30 and 15 feet high, on which 50 men might stand.) His foundation must be secure and solid ; for this rock will stand till Gabriel shall divide it by the power of God. Early in the morning the people assembled around this rock, men, women, boys and girls, together with dogs and other domestic animals. It is an entire forest about this place. The scenery is wild. On the north is a high hill, and north of this is a mountain called Chocorua, which touches...
Page 143 - The rocks, rude and ragged in a manner rarely paralleled, were fashioned, and piled on each other, by a hand, operating only in the boldest and most irregular manner. As we advanced, these appearances increased rapidly. Huge masses of granite, of every abrupt form, and hoary with a moss which seemed the product of ages, recalling to the mind the 10 "Saxum Vetustum" of Virgil speedily rose to a mountainous height.
Page 239 - Saco, that after 40 miles travel he did, for the most part, ascend, and within 12 miles of the top was neither tree nor grass, but low savins which they went upon the top of sometimes...
Page 240 - Acre of ground, with a pond of clear water in the midst of it; which you may hear run down, but how it ascends is a mystery. From this rocky Hill you may see the whole Country round about; it is far above the lower Clouds, and from hence we beheld a...
Page 27 - Hearken to the words of your father. I am an old oak, that has withstood the storms of more than a hundred winters. Leaves and branches have been stripped from me by the winds and frosts, — my eyes are dim, — my limbs totter, — I must soon fall! But when young and sturdy, when my bow no young man of the Pennacooks could...

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