Movable Bridges, Volume 1

Front Cover
J. Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 1926 - Bridges, Movable
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Contents

Swing bridges
20
Bascule bridges
22
Verticallift bridges
25
Statistics of movable bridges
26
Cost of maintenance repairs and operation of draw bridges
27
Bibliography of types rarely used
33
CHAPTER III
36
Superiority of centerbearing swing bridges
37
Statistics of swing bridges
39
Long and heavy swing bridges
40
General
41
Singletrack deck plate girder centerbearing swing spans
42
Singletrack centerbearing railway swing spans
46
Doubletrack centerbearing railway swing spans
49
Doubletrack rimbearing railway swing spans
54
Centerbearing highway swing spans
55
ARTICLE PAGE
59
Singletrack railway shearpole swing span
66
Approximate weights of throughtruss highway swing spans
74
CHAPTER IV
80
135th Street bridge New York City
89
Scherzer rollinglift bridges
101
Strauss bascule bridges
115
Brown bascule bridges
128
American bridge type bascule bridge
134
Miscellaneous bascule types with list of patents
142
Halsted Street liftbridge
151
Strauss type
166
Statistics
172
Common form of the equation of three moments
178
A centerbearing swing bridge with equal spans
184
Table of reactions
185
A uniform load on one span
186
A uniform load on both spans
190
Load conditions for calculating stresses
191
Stresses and design of a centerbearing swing bridge
193
Stresses corrected for actual truss conditions
201
Application to the truss shown in Fig 7D a
202
A centerbearing swing bridge with unequal spans
205
Reactions for a beam partially continuous over four supports No shear in the middle span
207
Double swing bridge
210
A single load on the first span
211
A single load on the second span
213
Lateral bracing
214
Deflection of the end of cantilever girder of varying section with a partial uniform load
229
Deflection of the end of a cantilever girder of varying section with a series of concentrated loads
232
Deflection at the end of a cantilever turntable by the analytical method
233
The areamoment method for calculating the deflection of beams
236
Deflection at the end of a cantilever turntable by the areamoment method 239 a 8 Deflection at the end of a cantilever turntable by the use of deflecti...
243
Deflection at the end of a cantilever turntable by an approximate method
247
Vertical deflection at the center of a girder with varying moment of inertia due to a concentrated load at any point
250
ARTICLE PAGE 11 Vertical deflection at the loaded point of a girder with varying moment of inertia
252
Vertical deflection at the center of a girder with varying moment of inertia due to a partial uniform load
254
Horizontal deflection of the upper corner of a simple beam
256
Deflection at the center of a deck plate girder a
258
Deflection of a truss
262
Deflection of one arm of a swing span
264
Deflection of frames containing members subjected to bending moments
269
CHAPTER X
271
End lifts and camber
272
Theory of wedge end lifts
275
Example
279
End and center wedges
284
Linkandroller end lift
286
Gardners end lift
288
Toggle end lift
289
Rockerandeccentric end lift
291
Reehls end rail lock
292
Balanced end latch
293
Disc center with load applied by hanger bolts
296
Threedisc center with pier not level
297
Disc centers with superposed load
299
Rack anchors
301
Main pinion bearings of centerbearing swing spans
303
Union bearings for bevel gears
304
Bearing supports
305
Turntables of drumbearing swing spans
306
CHAPTER XI
309
Sliding rail joints
311
CHAPTER XII
313
Concrete loaded with steel punchings
316
Pigiron counterweights
318
OPERATORS HOUSES
319
APPENDIX
329
APPENDIX
340
INDEX
349
Copyright

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Page v - Club (students interested in writing) ; student branches of the national engineering societies, the American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, American Institute of Electrical Engineers; American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers; Social Science Club; Italian Club; Chess Club.
Page 205 - Members subject to alternate stresses of tension and compression shall be proportioned for the stresses giving the largest section. If the alternate stresses occur in succession during the passage of one train, as in stiff counters, each stress shall be increased by 50 per cent. of the smaller.
Page 318 - ... of 1 part of cement, 2$ parts of sand and 5 parts of broken stone or gravel.
Page 80 - Drawbridge spans one of five openings in a stone bridge, bridge. built across a navigable branch of Salcombe Harbour ; it is in one leaf, 15 feet 9 inches wide, and 32 feet long, from out to out, supported upon a cast-iron shaft or axle, placed 7 feet 6 inches from the inner end, working in the abutment pier, which is built hollow to receive it, and thus the part within the axle end acts as a counter weight. To the centre of the end cross-beam of the counter part, a chain...
Page 3 - ... royal presents. In return, Anlaf promised, as he also performed, that he never again would come in a hostile manner to England.' I quote, as usual, from the best edition of this invaluable record, by Professor Ingram, London, 1823, 4to. It is generally believed, however, that the year following Anlaf's invasion, namely 994, there was built a low Wooden Bridge, which crossed the Thames at St. Botolph's Wharf...
Page 204 - The Special Committee on Specifications for Bridge Design and Construction of the American Society of Civil Engineers...
Page 74 - Engineers 3 recommends the following truck loadings as a basis for the design of steel highway bridges: H-20 20-ton trucks. H-15 15-ton trucks. H-13 13-ton trucks.
Page 3 - Renaissance, from the latter part of the fourteenth century to the middle of the sixteenth, was marked by a rapid and remarkable development in literature, art, science, government, and religious reform.
Page 294 - The other joints are finished cylindrical surfaces of the castings, 11 in. rad., 20| in. face, on babbitted surfaces, one in the upper end of the lower strut and one in the lower bearing shoe. Fiveinch pins are used here to join the parts and carry the weights only when the jacks are lifted, but they carry none of the loads when the ends are raised. The lower bearing shoe slides vertically about 7 in.
Page 27 - An engineer, when discussing with another the question of the selection of the most suitable type, expressed his views quite simply. His first choice was a bridge that remained on the ground when open; his second was one that had only one end lifted in the air; and his third, one in which both ends were lifted.

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