Report of the Congressional Committees Investigating the Iran/Contra Affair

Front Cover
DIANE Publishing, 1995 - 690 pages
Contents: The Report: executive summary; Central America; the arms sales to Iran; exposure and concealment; the enterprise; conclusions and recommendations. Also contains the Minority report: the foreign affairs powers of the Constitution and the Iran-Contra Affair; Nicaragua; Iran; disclosure and investigations; putting Congress' house in order; and recommendations. Extensive appendices contain additional views of several Representatives and Senators.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

V
25
VI
31
VII
59
VIII
85
IX
105
X
117
XI
137
XII
155
XLI
457
XLII
463
XLIII
471
XLIV
481
XLV
483
XLVI
489
XLVII
501
XLVIII
517

XIII
157
XIV
163
XV
175
XVI
193
XVII
213
XVIII
237
XIX
245
XX
269
XXI
277
XXII
283
XXIII
285
XXIV
287
XXV
293
XXVI
305
XXVII
325
XXVIII
327
XXIX
331
XXX
361
XXXI
373
XXXII
375
XXXIII
387
XXXIV
395
XXXV
411
XXXVI
423
XXXVII
429
XXXVIII
435
XXXIX
437
XL
455
XLIX
519
L
539
LI
549
LII
559
LIII
561
LIV
567
LV
573
LVI
575
LVII
581
LVIII
583
LIX
587
LX
635
LXI
637
LXII
639
LXIII
643
LXIV
651
LXV
655
LXVI
657
LXVII
659
LXVIII
661
LXIX
665
LXX
667
LXXI
673
LXXII
675
LXXIII
679
LXXIV
681
LXXV
683

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 389 - It is important to bear in mind that we are here dealing not alone with an authority vested in the President by an exertion of legislative power, but with such an authority plus the very delicate, plenary and exclusive power of the President as the sole organ of the federal government in the field of international relations...
Page 385 - No State or group of States has the right to intervene, directly or indirectly, for any reason whatever, in the internal or external affairs of any other State. The foregoing principle prohibits not only armed force but also any other form of interference or attempted threat against the personality of the State or against its political, economic and cultural elements.
Page 389 - When the President acts in absence of either a congressional grant or denial of authority, he can only rely upon his own independent powers, but there is a zone of twilight in which he and Congress may have concurrent authority, or in which its distribution is uncertain.
Page 389 - The President is the sole organ of the nation in its external relations, and its sole representative with foreign nations.
Page 603 - ... the Director of Central Intelligence and the heads of all departments, agencies, and other entities of the United States...
Page 22 - Our Government is the potent, the omnipresent teacher. For good or for ill, it teaches the whole people by its example. Crime is contagious. If the Government becomes a law-breaker, it breeds contempt for law; it invites every man to become a law unto himself; it invites anarchy.
Page 475 - Another privilege of a citizen of the United States is to demand the care and protection of the Federal government over his life, liberty, and property when on the high seas or within the jurisdiction of a foreign government. Of this there can be no doubt, nor that the right depends upon his character as a citizen of the United States.
Page 487 - Every act of aggression by a State against the territorial integrity or the inviolability of the territory or against the sovereignty or political independence of an American State shall be considered an act of aggression against the other American States.
Page 541 - 5) to perform such other functions and duties related to intelligence affecting the national security as the National Security Council may from time to time direct.
Page 529 - That whenever it shall be made known to the President that any citizen of the United States has been unjustly deprived of his liberty by or under the authority of any foreign government, it shall be the duty of the President forthwith to demand of that government the reasons...

Bibliographic information