Military antiquities respecting a history of the English army, from the Conquest, Volume 1

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this book comes in a series of three volumes. All are excellent. glad to see other copies.

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Page 228 - I had been happy, if the general camp, Pioners and all, had tasted her sweet body, So I had nothing known. O! now, for ever Farewell the tranquil mind; farewell content!
Page 327 - Soldier 20 pence weekly is to be answered, to the full value thereof, in good Apparel of different kinds, part for winter and part for summer, which is ordered of good quality and stuff for the prices ; patterns whereof must be sent to the Lord Deputy to be compared and prepared as followetb.
Page 392 - These truly wise men dwelt between the rivers Hyphasis and Ganges; their country Alexander the Great never entered, deterred not by the fear of the inhabitants, but, as I suppose, by religious considerations ; for, had he passed the Hyphasis, he might doubtless have made himself master of the country all round them ; but their cities he could never have taken, though he had led a thousand as brave as Achilles, or three thousand such as Ajax, to the assault : for they come not out into the field to...
Page 43 - I do fincerely promife and fwear, that I will be faithful, and bear true allegiance to his majefty King George. So help me 'God.
Page 9 - ... any of the king's enemies when they come into the land : and for this purpose, as well as for keeping the peace and pursuing felons, he may command all the people of his county to attend him, which is called the posse...
Page 400 - One Peter Baud, a Frenchman born,' says Stowe, ' and another alien called Peter Van Collen, a gunsmith, both the king's feed men, conferring together, devised and caused to be made certain mortar pieces, being at the mouth from eleven inches unto nineteen inches wide, for the use whereof they...
Page 163 - Maxwell, who commanded it, ordered his men to screw their bayonets into their muzzles to receive them, thinking they meant to decide the affair point to point ; but to his great surprise, when they came within a proper distance, the French threw in a heavy fire, which for a moment staggered his people, who by no means expected...
Page 7 - But tbis personal attendance growing troublesome in many respects, the tenants found means of compounding for it, by first sending others in their stead, and in process of time by making a pecuniary satisfaction to the crown in lieu of it. This pecuniary satisfaction...
Page 392 - It will no doubt strike the reader with wonder to find a prohibition of fire-arms in records of such unfathomable antiquity, and he will probably...
Page 388 - India : he says it was thrown from the bottom of a machine called a petrary, and that it came forward as large as a barrel of verjuice, with a tail of fire issuing from it as big as a great sword, making a noise in its passage like thunder, and seeming like a dragon flying through the air; and from the great quantity of fire it threw out, giving such a light, that one might see in the camp as if it had been day.

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