Arcana of Science and Art: Or, An Annual Register of Useful Inventions and Improvements, Discoveries and New Facts, in Mechanics, Chemistry, Natural History, and Social Economy

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John Limbird, 1830 - Technology
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Page 188 - While thus exerting himself, a bystander, destitute of sight, would suppose that the whole feathered tribes had assembled together on a trial of skill, each striving to produce his utmost effect, — so perfect are his imitations. He many times deceives the sportsman, and sends him in search of birds that perhaps are not within miles of him, but whose notes he exactly imitates. Even birds themselves are frequently imposed on by this admirable mimic, and are decoyed by the fancied...
Page 198 - By the time the cayman was within two yards of me I saw he was in a state of fear and perturbation. I instantly dropped the mast, sprung up and jumped on his back, turning half round as I vaulted, so that I gained my seat with my face in a right position. I immediately seized his fore-legs, and by main force twisted them on his back; thus they served me for a bridle.
Page 216 - Benares, andi in other places, wear very thin plates of gold, called ticas, slightly fixed, by way of ornament, between their eye-brows ; and, when they pass through the streets, it is not uncommon for the youthful libertines, who amuse themselves with training...
Page 193 - ... beyond my depth : the water was the coldest I ever felt, and the taste of it most detestable; it was that of a solution of nitre, mixed with an infusion of quassia. Its buoyancy I found to be far greater than that of any sea I ever swam in, not excepting the Euxine, which is extremely salt. I...
Page 187 - They consist of short expressions of two, three, or at the most five or six syllables ; generally interspersed with imitations, and all of them uttered with great emphasis and rapidity ; and continued, with undiminished ardour, for half an hour or an hour at a time.
Page 136 - ... upon a platina tray, under an inverted pot, to the heat of a wind-furnace. The ingot, on being taken out of the furnace, is immediately to be plunged into dilute sulphuric acid, which in the course of a few hours will entirely dissolve the flux adhering to the surface.
Page 188 - His notes consist of a clear mellow whistle, repeated at short intervals as he gleams among the branches. There is in it a certain wild plaintiveness and naivete extremely interesting. It is not uttered with rapidity, but with the pleasing tranquillity of a careless ploughboy, whistling for amusement.
Page 188 - This excessive fondness for variety, however, in the opinion of some, injures his song. His elevated imitations of the Brown Thrush are...
Page 267 - The feathers when thoroughly moistened will sink down, and should remain in the limewater three or four days ; after which the foul liquor should be separated from them by laying them in a sieve. The feathers should be afterwards well washed in clean water, and dried upon nets, the meshes of which may be about the fineness of cabbage-nets. The feathers must be from time to time shaken on the nets, and as they dry will fall through the meshes, and are to be collected for use.
Page 141 - ... well luted. By keeping the water to the boiling point, the mixture in the retort will distil over into the receiver, which should be covered over with wet cloths. In this manner will be obtained pure Eau de Cologne.

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