Climate Change: An Encyclopedia of Science and History [4 volumes]: An Encyclopedia of Science and History

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ABC-CLIO, Jan 8, 2013 - Science - 1774 pages
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Climate change is a controversial topic that promises to reframe rudimentary ideas about our world and how we will live in it. The articles in Climate Change: An Encyclopedia of Science and History are designed to inform readers' decision making through the insight of scholars from around the world, each of whom brings a unique approach to this topic. The work goes beyond pure science to consider other important factors, weighing the cultural, historical, and policy-driven contributors to this issue. In addition, the book explores the ideas that have converged and evolved in order to clarify our current predicament.

By considering climate change in this holistic fashion, this reference collection will prepare readers to consider the issue from every angle. Each article in the work is suitable for general readers, particularly students in high school and college, and is intended to inform and educate anyone about climate change, providing valuable information regarding the stages of mitigation and adaptation that are occurring all around us.

 

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Contents

AD Entries
1
Volume 2
434
List of Entries
434
EG Entries
435
Volume 3
840
List of Entries
840
HS Entries
841
Volume 4
1316
List of Entries
1316
TW Entries
1317
Appendices
1445
General Bibliography
1651
About the Editors and Contributors
1695
Index
1711
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Brian C. Black, PhD, is head of the Division of Arts and Humanities and professor in the departments of History and Environmental Studies at Pennsylvania State University, Altoona College, PA.

David M. Hassenzahl, PhD, is dean of the School of Sustainability and the Environment at Chatham University.

Jennie C. Stephens, PhD, is associate professor of environmental science and policy at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Gary Weisel is professor of physics at Pennsylvania State University, Altoona College, PA. He holds two doctorates, one in Physics from Duke University and one in History of Science from the University of Florida.

Nancy Gift, PhD, is Compton Chair of Sustainability at Berea College, Berea, KY.

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