The Metaphor of God Incarnate: Christology in a Pluralistic Age

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Westminster John Knox Press, 2006 - Religion - 204 pages
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In this groundbreaking work, John Hick refutes the traditional Christian understanding of Jesus of Nazareth. According to Hick, Jesus did not teach what was to become the orthodox understanding of him: that he was God incarnate who became human to die for the sins of the world. Further, the traditional dogma of Jesus' two natures--human and divine--cannot be explained satisfactorily, and worse, it has been used to justify great human evils. Thus, the divine incarnation, he explains, is best understood metaphorically. Nevertheless, he concludes that Christians can still understand Jesus as Lord and the one who has made God real to us. This second edition includes new chapters on the Christologies of Anglican theologian John Macquarrie and Catholic theologian Roger Haight, SJ.

 

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Contents

Todays Starting Point
1
Jesus Life Death and Resurrection
15
From Jesus to Christ
27
The Churchs Affirmation of Jesus Deity
40
Two Natures Two Minds?
47
Divine Selfemptying?
61
Further Problems of Kenosis
72
Historical Sideeffects of the Churchs Dogma
80
Atonement by the Blood of Jesus?
112
Salvation as Human Transformation
127
SalvationLiberation as a Worldwide Process
134
Christian Truth and Other Truths
140
New Anglican Thinking
150
New Catholic Thinking
161
What Does This Mean for the Churches?
174
Reference Bibliography
189

Plural Incarnations?
89
Divine Incarnation as Metaphor
99

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About the author (2006)

John Hick is Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Research in Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Birmingham in England. He is the author of a number of books, including A Christian Theology of Religions, Death and Eternal Life, and God Has Many Names , all of which are published by WJK.

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