The Oligarchs: Wealth And Power In The New Russia

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PublicAffairs, Sep 13, 2011 - History - 608 pages
3 Reviews
In this saga of brilliant triumphs and magnificent failures, David E. Hoffman, the former Moscow bureau chief for the Washington Post, sheds light on the hidden lives of Russia's most feared power brokers: the oligarchs. Focusing on six of these ruthless men— Alexander Smolensky, Yuri Luzhkov, Anatoly Chubais, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Boris Berezovsky, and Vladimir Gusinsky—Hoffman shows how a rapacious, unruly capitalism was born out of the ashes of Soviet communism.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - everfresh1 - LibraryThing

It is a story of wealth creation by six oligarchs (Berezovsky, Smolensky, Chodorovsky, Gusinsky, Luzhkov and Chubais - although the last two do not really belong to the list of typical Russian ... Read full review

The oligarchs: wealth and power in the new Russia

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

There seems to be little question that the handful of men who became wealthy and powerful after the demise of the Soviet Union were greedy to the point of being criminal. Matthew Brzezinski's Casino ... Read full review

Contents

Prologue
1
Unlocking the Treasure
177
Easy Money
209
The Man Who Rebuilt Moscow
237
The Club on Sparrow Hills
270
31
286
The Embrace of Wealth and Power
296
Saving Boris Yeltsin
325
54
391
Roar of the Dragons
397
78
436
Hardball and Silver Bullets
442
Epilogue
491
Bibliography
551
127
560
209
568

The Bankers War
365

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About the author (2011)

David E. Hoffman is a contributing editor at the Washington Post. He covered the White House during the presidencies of Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, and was subsequently diplomatic correspondent and Jerusalem correspondent. From 1995 to 2001, he served as Moscow bureau chief, and later as foreign editor and assistant managing editor for foreign news. He is the author of The Dead Hand, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction.

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