Three Revolutions: Steering Automated, Shared, and Electric Vehicles to a Better Future

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Island Press, 2018 - ARCHITECTURE - 251 pages
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For the first time in half a century, real transformative innovations are coming to our world of passenger transportation. The convergence of new shared mobility services with automated and electric vehicles promises to significantly reshape our lives and communities for the better—or for the worse.

The dream scenario could bring huge public and private benefits, including more transportation choices, greater affordability and accessibility, and healthier, more livable cities, along with reduced greenhouse gas emissions. The nightmare scenario could bring more urban sprawl, energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and unhealthy cities and individuals.

In Three Revolutions, transportation expert Dan Sperling, along with seven other leaders in the field, share research–based insights on potential public benefits and impacts of the three transportation revolutions. They describe innovative ideas and partnerships, and explore the role government policy can play in steering the new transportation paradigm toward the public interest—toward our dream scenario of social equity, environmental sustainability, and urban livability.

Many factors will influence these revolutions—including the willingness of travelers to share rides and eschew car ownership; continuing reductions in battery, fuel cell, and automation costs; and the adaptiveness of companies. But one of the most important factors is policy.

Three Revolutions offers policy recommendations and provides insight and knowledge that could lead to wiser choices by all. With this book, Sperling and his collaborators hope to steer these revolutions toward the public interest and a better quality of life for everyone.
 

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Contents

1 Will the Transportation Revolutions Improve Our Lives or Make Them Worse?
1
Approaching the Tipping Point
21
The Potential of Ridehailing and Pooling
55
Our Best Shot at a Transportation DoOver?
77
5 Upgrading Transit for the TwentyFirst Century
109
6 Bridging the Gap between Mobility Haves and HaveNots
131
7 Remaking the Auto Industry
151
Will China Win the Electric Automated Shared Mobility Race?
167
Epilogue
189
Notes
197
About the Contributors
223
Index
227
IP Board of Directors
235
Copyright

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About the author (2018)

Daniel Sperling is founding director of the UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies and co-director of the National Center for Sustainable Transportation at UC Davis. He is a distinguished professor of civil and environmental engineering and environmental science and policy at UC Davis, and is a member of the influential California Air Resources Board.
Anne Brown is a researcher at the Institute of Transportation Studies at the Luskin School of Public Affairs at UCLA.
Robin Chase co-founded Zipcar and Veniam.
Michael J. Dunnefounded Dunne Automotive Ltd.
Steven E. Polzin is a professor of civil and transportation engineering at the University of South Florida, Tampa, and director of mobility policy research there.
Susan Shaheen is an adjunct professor of civil and environmental engineering at UC Berkeley.
Brian D. Taylor is a professor of urban planning and director of the Institute of Transportation Studies and Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies in the Luskin School of Public Affairs at UCLA.
Levi Tillemannis a fellow at the New America Foundation and managing partner at the consulting firm Valence Strategic.

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