Quercus, Or, Oaks: From the French of Michaux : Histoire Des Chênes de L'Amérique Septentrionale ; with Notes and an Appendix

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Graisberry and Campbell, printers, 1809 - Oak - 73 pages
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Page 12 - Traité des arbres et arbustes qui se cultivent en France en pleine terre...
Page viii - La botanique mise à la portée de tout le monde, ou collection des plantes d'usage dans la médecine, dans les alimens et dans les arts.
Page 12 - The Natural History of the Rarer Lepidopterous Insects of Georgia, including their Systematic Characters, the Particulars of their several Metamorphoses, and the Plants on which they feed. Collected from the observations of Mr. John Abbot, many years resident in that country, by James Edward Smith, MD, FRS...
Page 58 - This species is found growing naturally in Italy and Spain. The leaves are smooth, and deeply sinuated, like winged leaves; some of the sinuses are obtuse, and others end in acute points; they have very short footstalks, the branches are covered with a purplish bark when young; the acorns are long and slender, the cups rough and a little prickly, sitting close to the branches.
Page 52 - ... the broad-leaved evergreen is the most common ; the leaves of this are entire, about two inches long, and an inch and a quarter broad, with a little down on their under sides, on short footstalks ; these leaves continue green through the winter till May, when they generally fall off just before the...
Page 52 - ... evergreen is the most common ; the leaves of this are entire, about two inches long, and an inch and a quarter broad, with a little down on their under sides, on short footstalks ; these leaves continue green through the winter till May, when they generally fall off just before the new leaves come out ; the acorns are very like those of the common oak.
Page xi - Editio quarta, post Reichardianam quinta, adjectis vegetabilibus hucusque cognitis, curante Carolo Ludovico WILLDENOW.
Page 52 - May, when they generally fall off just before the new leaves come out ; the acorns are very like those of the common oak. The exterior bark is the cork, which is taken from the tree every eight or ten years ; there is an interior bark which nourishes them, so that stripping off the outer bark is so far from injuring the trees, that it is necessary to continue them ; for when the bark is not taken off, they seldom last longer than fifty or sixty years...
Page 50 - ... four inches long, and one broad near the base, gradually lessening to a point. They are of a lucid green on the upper side, but whitish and downy on the under ; and are entire, standing on pretty long foot-stalks.
Page 52 - ... so that the stripping; off the outer coat is so far from injuring the trees, that it is of real service ; for when it is not taken off, they seldom last longer than fifty or sixty years in. health ; whereas trees which are barked every eight or ten years, will live 150, or more. The bark of a young tree is porous and good for little ; however, it is useful to take it off when the trees are twelve or fifseen years old ; for without this, it will never be good.

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