The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, 1770-1823

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Oxford University Press, Apr 15, 1999 - Social Science - 577 pages
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David Brion Davis's books on the history of slavery reflect some of the most distinguished and influential thinking on the subject to appear in the past generation. The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, the sequel to Davis's Pulitzer Prize-winning The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture and the second volume of a proposed trilogy, is a truly monumental work of historical scholarship that first appeared in 1975 to critical acclaim both academic and literary. This reprint of that important work includes a new preface by the author, in which he situates the book's argument within the historiographic debates of the last two decades.
 

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Contents

The Emancipation of America I
255
The Emancipation of America II
285
The Preservation of English Liberty I
343
The Preservation of English Liberty II
386
Antislavery and the Conflict of Laws
469
The Good Book
523
Toussaint LOuverture and the Phenomenology of Mind
557
Index
565

The Quaker Ethic and the Antislavery International
213

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Page 9 - ... and that this assemblage of horrors might want no fact of distinguished die, he is now exciting those very people to rise in arms among us, and to purchase that liberty of which he has deprived them, by murdering the people...
Page 9 - He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither.
Page 12 - A strict observance of the written laws is doubtless one of the high duties of a good citizen : but it is not the highest. The laws of necessity, of self-preservation, of saving our country when in danger, are of higher obligation.
Page 12 - Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep for ever...

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About the author (1999)

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History at Yale University. A former President of the Organization of American Historians, he has won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Bancroft Prize, and the American Historical Association's Beveridge Award. His most recent book is The Boisterous Sea of Liberty: A Documentary History of America from Discovery through the Civil War (Oxford University Press, 1998, with Steven Mintz).

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