A Tangled Tale

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Macmillan, 1885 - Adventure stories - 152 pages
 

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Contents

I
1
II
4
III
13
IV
19
V
27
VI
34
VII
43
VIII
52
IX
58
X
66

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Page 54 - THE SOLDIER'S TEAR. UPON the hill he turn'd, To take a last fond look Of the valley and the village church, And the cottage by the brook : He listen'd to the sounds So familiar to his ear, And the soldier leant upon his sword, And wiped away a tear.
Page 152 - Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing. Good night, good night ! parting is such sweet sorrow, That I shall say — good night, till it be morrow.
Page 64 - There's a fallacy somewhere" he murmured drowsily, as he stretched his long legs upon the sofa. "I must think it over again." He closed his eyes, in order to concentrate his attention more perfectly, and for the next hour or so his slow and regular breathing bore witness to the careful deliberation with which he was investigating this new and perplexing view of the subject.
Page 136 - Only that portion of the smaller bucket which descends below the original level of the water can be properly said to be immersed, and only an equal bulk of water is displaced." Hence, according to HECLA, a solid whose weight was equal to that of an equal bulk of water, would not float till the whole of it was below "the original level" of the water: but, as a matter of fact, it would float as soon as it was all under water. MAGPIE says the fallacy is "the assumption that one body can displace another...
Page 69 - THE CHELSEA PENSIONERS. Problem. — If 70 per cent, have lost an eye, 75 per cent, an ear, 80 per cent, an arm, 85 per cent, a leg: what percentage, at least, must have lost all four ? Answer. — Ten. Solution. — (I adopt that of POLAR STAR, as being better than my own). Adding the wounds together, we get 70 +75 + 80 + 85 = 310, among 100 men ; which gives 3 to each, and 4 to 10 men.
Page 64 - If you hold a stick, six feet long, with its end in a tumbler of water, and wait long enough, you must eventually be immersed. The question as to the source from which the water is supplied — which belongs to a high branch of mathematics, and is therefore beyond our present scope — does not apply to the sea. Let us therefore take the familiar instance of a man standing at the edge of the sea, at ebb-tide, with a solid in his hand, which he partially immerses: he remains steadfast and unmoved,...
Page 11 - The landlady looked round suspiciously, as if to make sure the cat was not listening. " I will not deceive you, gentlemen," she said. " It do scratch, but not without you pulls its whiskers ! It'll never do it," she repeated slowly, with a visible effort to recall the exact words of some written agreement between herself and the cat, "without you pulls its whiskers !" " Much may be excused in a cat so treated," said Balbus as they left the house and crossed to No.

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