The Gorgias of Plato

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George Bell and Sons, 1905 - 278 pages
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Page xix - It has always been the rule that those should take who have the power and those should keep who can, and no man possessing this power ever stayed his hand for abstract considerations of justice.
Page 172 - For why ? — because the good old rule Sufficeth them, the simple plan, That they should take, who have the power, And they should keep who can.
Page 223 - Non aliter diris verborum obsessa venenis Palluit et nigris terrenisque ignibus arsit, Quam si fraterna prohiberet imagine tellus Insereretque suas flammis caelestibus umbras, Et patitur tantos cantu depressa labores 505 Donee suppositas propior despumet in herbas.
Page 279 - I. With Notes, and an Essay on the Character of the Writer. Edited by A. Pretor, MA, late of Trinity College, Fellow of St. Catharine's College, Cambridge.
Page 279 - A Series of Classical Texts, annotated by well-known scholars, with a special view to the requirements of upper forms in Public Schools, or of University Students. A RISTOPHANES. The Peace. A Revised Text with English Notes and a Preface. By FA Paley, MA 4*.
Page 279 - Terence. By W. Wagner, Ph.D. 10s. 6d. Theocritus. By FA Paley, MA 4s. 6d. Thucydides. Book VI. By TW Dougan, MA, Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge.
Page 154 - Ain tu? aliter id scire non potes? — Nullo modo. — Tu igitur ne de Persarum quidem rege magno potes dicere, beatusne sit? — An ego s0possim, cum ignorem, quam sit doctus, quam vir bonus?
Page 279 - The Greek Text revised, with an Analysis and English Notes. By W. WAYTE, MA, Fellow of King's College, Cambridge, and Assistant Master at Eton.
Page 189 - I know I love in vain, strive against hope ; Yet, in this captious and intenible sieve, I still pour in the waters of my love...
Page xiii - Thompson, after quoting Olympiodorus approvingly, paraphrases him: "The aim of the Gorgias is to discuss the principles which conduce to political well-being. It [the preceding paraphrastic sentence] explains, at least to a considerable extent, the later as well as the earlier discussions; whereas if we assume that the main end of the dialogue is to bring the art of rhetoric and its professors into discredit, we can assign no significant motive for the importance assigned to a character like Callicles,...

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