Richard Carvel

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Macmillan, 1899 - Maryland - 538 pages
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Review: Richard Carvel

User Review  - Pamela - Goodreads

I thought I would check out an old classic from the bookshelf. The end leaf was inscribed with Brett's great grandmother's signature and I was curious about what an author Winston Churchill could be ... Read full review

Review: Richard Carvel

User Review  - Goodreads

I thought I would check out an old classic from the bookshelf. The end leaf was inscribed with Brett's great grandmother's signature and I was curious about what an author Winston Churchill could be ... Read full review

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Page 187 - Her feet beneath her petticoat Like little mice stole in and out, As if they feared the light: But, oh ! she dances such a way— No sun upon an Easter day Is half so fine a sight.
Page 447 - SIR, — His Majesty has thought proper to order a new commission of the Treasury to be made out, in which I do not perceive your name.
Page 520 - LOVE me little, love me long, Is the burden of my song. Love that is too hot and strong Burneth soon to waste : Still, I would not have thee cold, Not too backward, nor too bold ; Love that lasteth till 'tis old Fadeth not in haste.
Page 371 - Fox, (added he,) is a most extraordinary man; here is a man (describing him in strong terms of objection in some respects according as he apprehended, but which exalted his abilities the more,) who has divided the Kingdom with Caesar; so that it was a doubt whether the nation should be ruled by the sceptre of George the Third, or the tongue of Fox.
Page 542 - No such piece of inimitable comedy in a literary way has appeared for years. ... It is the purest, keenest fun.
Page vii - ... Colonial life still undisturbed. The foreword, put into the mouth of Daniel Clapsaddle Carvel, supposed grandson of the hero, pictured the town almost as it was in 1899, and offended many of the townspeople. But the book itself probably helped to destroy the sort of place it described. Churchill wrote : "The lively capital- which once reflected the wit and fashion of Europe has fallen into decay. The silent streets no more echo with the rumble of coaches and gay chariots, and grass grows where...
Page 541 - There are two chief reasons why Mr. Allen seems to me one of the first of our novelists to-day. He is most exquisitely alive to the fine spirit of comedy. He has a prose style of wonderful beauty, conscientiousness, and simplicity.
Page 541 - From the Daily Chronicle, London. "There are descriptive passages so exquisitely wrought that the reader lingers over them to make them a possession forever ; there are inner experiences so intensely realized that they become a part of the life of his own soul.
Page 542 - No such piece of inimitable comedy, in a literary way, has appeared for years. ... It is the purest, keenest fun.
Page 536 - Ere I had regained my health, the war for Independence was won. I pray God that time may soften the bitterness it caused, and heal the breach in that noble race whose motto is Freedom. That the Stars and Stripes and the Union Jack may one day float together to cleanse this world of tyranny...

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