The Magnificent Ambersons

Front Cover
Createspace Independent Pub, 2009 - Fiction - 164 pages
THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS, about life in a Midwestern American town, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1919. It was the second volume in Booth Tarkington's trilogy Growth, which included The Turmoil (1915) and The Midlander (1923, later retitled National Avenue). THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS traces the growth of the United States through the decline of the once-powerful, socially prominent Amberson family. The fall of THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS is contrasted with the rise of new industrial tycoons and land developers, whose power comes not through family connections but through financial dealings and modern manufacturing.

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The Magnificent Ambersons (Bantam Classic)

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Though not out of print, this latest offering from Bantam is the least expensive edition currently available. The 1919 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel portrays the decline of the superrich Amberson ... Read full review

Review: The Magnificent Ambersons (The Growth Trilogy #2)

User Review  - Randee - Goodreads

I love reading about turn of the century America as well as the language of the late 1800s, early 1900s. This does both beautifully with a mix of serious and comic melodrama and flowery language. The ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Newton Booth Tarkington was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on July 29, 1869. He was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy, than spent his first two years of college at Purdue University and his last two at Princeton University. When his class graduated in 1893, he lacked sufficient credits for a degree. Upon leaving Princeton, he returned to Indiana determined to pursue a career as a writer. Tarkington was an early member of The Dramatic Club, founded in 1889, and often wrote plays and directed and acted in its productions. After a five-year apprenticeship full of publishers' rejection slips, Tarkington enjoyed a huge commercial success with The Gentleman from Indiana, which was published in 1899. He produced a total of 171 short stories, 21 novels, 9 novellas, and 19 plays along with a number of movie scripts, radio dramas, and even illustrations over the course of a career that lasted from 1899 until his death in 1946. His novels included Monsieur Beaucaire, The Flirt, Seventeen, Gentle Julia, and The Turmoil. He won the Pulitzer Prize in fiction in 1919 and 1922 for his novels The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams. He used the political knowledge he acquired while serving one term in the Indiana House of Representatives in the short story collection In the Arena. In collaboration with dramatist Harry Leon Wilson, Tarkington wrote The Man from Home, the first of many successful Broadway plays. He wrote children's stories in the final phase of his career. He died on May 19, 1946 after an illness.

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