The Visitor, Volume 2

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Edward and Charles Dilly, 1764 - English essays
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Page 92 - Tis mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the heart of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice.
Page 182 - This is the state of man : To-day he puts forth The tender leaves of hope ; to-morrow blossoms, And bears his blushing honours thick upon him : The third day, comes a frost, a killing frost; And, — when he thinks, good easy man, full surely His greatness is a ripening, — nips his root, And then he falls, as I do.
Page 72 - They mount up to the heaven, They go down again to the depths : Their soul is melted because of trouble. They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, And are at their wits
Page 182 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground ; Another race the following spring supplies, They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay, So flourish these, when those are past away.
Page 73 - O that men would therefore praise the Lord, and declare the wonders that He doth for the children of men!
Page 207 - Say unto them, As I live, saith the Lord GOD, I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked; but that the wicked turn from his way and live: turn ye, turn ye from your evil ways; for why will ye die, O house of Israel?
Page 91 - Wilt thou draw near the nature of the gods ? Draw near them then in being merciful ; Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge : Thrice-noble Titus, spare my first-born son.
Page 149 - All discord, harmony not understood ; All partial evil, universal good : And, spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, WHATEVER is, is RIGHT.
Page 149 - Cease then, nor order imperfection name : Our proper bliss depends on what we blame. Know thy own point : This kind, this due degree Of blindness, weakness, Heaven bestows on thee.
Page 181 - I myself have seen the ungodly in great power : and flourishing like a green bay-tree. I went by, and lo, he was gone : I sought him, but his place could no where be found.

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