A Christmas Carol

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Bradbury & Evans, 1858 - Christmas stories - 100 pages
125 Reviews
Everyone is familiar with this classic Christmas story. Ebenezer Scrooge is a miserly, unpleasant man who despises Christmas and overworks his clerk Bob Cratchit. As he prepares for another Christmas Eve without celebration, Scrooge is greeted by his dead business partner, Jacob Marley who warns him that his greed will not go unpunished. At first, Scrooge doesn't heed Marley's warning, but soon he is visited by the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Christmas Yet to Come. He is made to face his cruel nature, and to consider whether he should change his ways.

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A true classic!

User Review  - Jessica - Christianbook.com

In what is probably Charles Dickens' best known work we meet Ebenezer Scrooge, a rich old miser who loves money more than anything else. One Christmas Eve night he is visited by the ghost of his old ... Read full review

User Review  - moose - Christianbook.com

I enjoyed this book very much. Scrooge is a great redemptive story so full of hope. Read full review

All 12 reviews »

Contents

I
1
II
24
III
45
IV
73
V
92

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Page 1 - Marley was dead, to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it. And Scrooge's name was good upon 'Change, for anything he chose to put his hand to.
Page 56 - Miss Belinda sweetened up the apple-sauce ; Martha dusted the hot plates ; Bob took Tiny Tim beside him in a tiny corner at the table ; the two young Cratchits set chairs for everybody, not forgetting themselves, and, mounting guard upon their posts, crammed spoons into their mouths, lest they should shriek for goose before their turn came to be helped.
Page 11 - But I suppose you must have the whole day. Be here all the earlier next morning!
Page 54 - Hurrah! There's such a goose, Martha!" "Why, bless your heart alive, my dear, how late you are!" said Mrs. Cratchit, kissing her a dozen times, and taking off her shawl and bonnet for her. "We'da deal of work to finish up last night," replied the girl, "and had to clear away this morning, mother!
Page 55 - His active little crutch was heard upon the floor, and back came Tiny Tim before another word was spoken, escorted by his brother and sister to his stool beside the fire ; and while Bob, turning up his cuffs, — as if, poor fellow, they were capable of being made more shabby, — compounded some hot mixture in a jug with gin and lemons, and stirred it round and round and put it on the hob to simmer, Master Peter and the two ubiquitous young Cratchits went to fetch the goose, with which they soon...
Page 3 - Christmas Eve — old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house. It was cold, bleak, biting weather, foggy withal, and he could hear the people in the court outside go wheezing up and down, beating their hands upon their breasts, and stamping their feet upon the pavement stones to warm them.
Page 58 - ... chestnuts on the fire. Then all the Cratchit family drew round the hearth, in what Bob Cratchit called a circle, meaning half a one ; and at Bob Cratchit's elbow stood the family display of glass. Two tumblers and a custard-cup without a handle.
Page 7 - I am sorry, with all my heart, to find you so resolute". We have never had any quarrel, to which I have been a party. But I have made the trial in homage to Christmas, and I'll keep my Christmas humor to the last. So A Merry Christmas, uncle!
Page 6 - ... to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys. And therefore, uncle, though it has never put a scrap of gold or silver in my pocket, I believe that it has done me good, and will do me good ; and I say, God bless it !" The clerk in the tank involuntarily applauded.
Page 21 - Expect the second on the next night at the same hour. The third upon the next night when the last stroke of twelve has ceased to vibrate. Look to see me no more; and look that, for your own sake, you remember what has passed between us!

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