The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

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Psychology Press, 1998 - History - 363 pages
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The first continuous national history of any western people in their own language, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicletraces the history of early England from the migration of the Saxon war-lords, through Roman Britain, the onslaught of the Vikings, the Norman Conquest and on through the reign of Stephen (1135-54).
The text survives, in whole or in part, in eight separate manuscripts, each reflecting the concerns of the regions and institutions in which they were maintained. These texts have a similar core, but each has considerable local variations and its own intricate textual history.
Michael J. Swanton's translation of these histories is the most complete and faithful reading ever published. Extensive notes draw on the latest evidence of paleographers, archaeologists and textual and social historians to place these annals in the context of current knowledge. Fully indexed and complemented by maps and genealogical tables, this edition allows ready access to one of the prime sources of English national culture. The introduction provides all the information a first-time reader could need, cutting an easy route through often complicated matters. Also includes nine maps.
 

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Contents

Frontis Swordhilts from the City of London and Fiskerton
55
Dragon prow or sternpost from a Migrationperiod
188
Acknowledgements
364
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About the author (1998)

Michael J. Swanton is Professor of Medieval Studies at the University of Exeter. His extensive publications include translations of the epic poem Beowulf (1978) and a selection of Anglo Saxon Prose (1993).

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