Badminton Library of Sports and Pastimes, Volume 7

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1895
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Page 297 - Fill'd with the face of heaven, which, from afar, Comes down upon the waters; all its hues, From the rich sunset to the rising star, Their magical variety diffuse: And now they change ; a paler shadow strews Its mantle o'er the mountains; parting day Dies like the dolphin, whom each pang imbues •*> With a new colour as it gasps away, The last still loveliest, — till — 'tis gone — and all is gray.
Page vii - PREFACE A FEW LINES only are necessary to explain the object with which these volumes are put forth. There is no modern encyclopaedia to which the inexperienced man, who seeks guidance in the practice of the various British Sports and Pastimes, can turn for information. Some books there are on Hunting, some on Racing, some on Lawn Tennis, some on Fishing, and so on ; but one Library, or succession of volumes, which treats of the Sports and Pastimes indulged in by Englishmen — and women — is wanting....
Page v - May 1885. HAVING received permission to dedicate these volumes, the BADMINTON LIBRARY of SPORTS and PASTIMES, to His ROYAL HIGHNESS THE PRINCE OF WALES, I do so feeling that I am dedicating them to one of the best and keenest sportsmen of our time. I can say, from personal observation, that there is no man who can extricate himself from a bustling and pushing crowd of horsemen, when a fox breaks covert, more dexterously...
Page viii - ... experience written by men who are in every case adepts at the Sport or Pastime of which they write. It is to point the way to success to those who are ignorant of the sciences they aspire to master, and who have no friend to help or coach them, that these volumes are written. To those who have worked hard to place simply and clearly before the reader that which he will find within, the best thanks of the Editor are due. That it has been no slight labour to supervise all that has been written...
Page 14 - Sailors say the tide is flowing, which is practically equivalent to saying the water is rising.1 When it has risen to its full height the term flood tide, or high water, is used. When the tide turns and the water begins to run in the opposite direction, it is said to be not flowing, but ebbing, and the period during which the water ebbs is termed the ebb tide. Just between the end of the flood and the beginning of the ebb, or, in other words, at the turn of the tide, the speed of the tidal current...
Page vi - Highness knocking over driven grouse and partridges and high-rocketing pheasants in first-rate workmanlike style. He is held to be a good yachtsman, and as Commodore of the Royal Yacht Squadron is looked up to by those who love that pleasant and exhilarating pastime. His encouragement of racing is well known, and his attendance at the University, Public School, and other important Matches testifies to his being, like most English gentlemen, fond of all manly sports. I consider it a great privilege...
Page v - THE PRINCE OF WALES, I do so feeling that I am dedicating them to one of the best and keenest sportsmen of our time. I can say, from personal observation, that there is no man who can extricate himself from a bustling and pushing crowd of horsemen, when a fox breaks covert, more dexterously and quickly than His Royal Highness; and that when hounds run hard over a big country, no man can take a line of his own and live with them better.
Page vi - Royal Highness ; and that when hounds run hard over a big country, no man can take a line of his own and live with them better. Also, when the wind has been blowing hard, often have I seen His Royal Highness knocking over driven grouse and partridges and high-rocketing pheasants in first-rate workmanlike style. He is held to be a good yachtsman, and as Commodore of the Royal Yacht Squadron is looked up to by those who love that pleasant and exhilarating pastime. His encouragement of racing is well...
Page vii - Watson, is intended to take the place of a standard work, of a complete "modern encyclopaedia, to which the inexperienced man, who seeks guidance in the practice of the various British sports and pastimes, can turn for information." It contains " the result of many years' experience written by men who are in every case adepts at the sport or pastime of which they write.
Page 447 - The Silver Fish, or Grande Ecaille, is common everywhere on the gulf coast. It is an immense and active fish, preying eagerly upon schools of young fry, or any small fish that it is able to receive into its mouth, and in pursuit of which it ascends fresh-water rivers quite a long distance.

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