George Orwell: As I please, 1943-1946

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David R. Godine Publisher, Jan 1, 2000 - Literary Collections - 435 pages
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Review: My Country Right or Left: 1940-1943 (The Collected Essays, Journalism & Letters, Vol. 2)

User Review  - Matthew - Goodreads

If Volume 1 was a portrait of the writer as a young socialist, then part two is when George Orwell goes to war. It is a little difficult to tell, since the four volumes are misleadingly referred to as ... Read full review

Review: An Age Like This: 1920-1940 (The Collected Essays, Journalism & Letters, Vol. 1)

User Review  - Bruce Sales - Goodreads

The best writing I've ever read. Read full review

Contents

The English People
1
In Defence of English Cooking
38
A Nice Cup of Tea
40
Review of The Pub and the People by Mass Observation
43
The Moon under Water
44
Review of Cricket Country by Edmund Blunden
47
1943
51
Letter to Philip Rahv
53
Letter to John Middleton Murry
206
As I Please
207
As I Please
210
Raffles and Miss Blandish
212
As I Please
224
As I Please
228
As I Please
231
Arthur Koestler
234

As I Please
54
As I Please
58
Review of Collected Poems by W H Davies
61
As I Please
63
As I Please
65
1944
69
As I Please
71
As I Please
73
London Letter to Partisan Review
74
As I Please
82
As I Please
83
As I Please
87
As I Please
89
A Hundred Up
93
Letter to Gleb Struve
95
As I Please
96
Review of The Edge of the Abyss by Alfred Noyes
99
As I Please
101
Letter to Roy Fuller
104
As I Please
108
As I Please
114
Review of The Road to Serfdom by F A Hayek etc
117
As I Please
119
London Letter to Partisan Review
123
As I Please
128
As I Please
131
Propaganda and Demotic Speech
135
Letter to Philip Rahv
141
As I Please
143
As I Please
145
Letter to H J Willmett
148
Some Notes on Salvador Dali
156
As I Please
165
As I Please
176
As I Please
178
As I Please
181
Letter to John Middleton Murry
184
Letter to Rayner Heppenstall
185
Letter to Leonard Moore
186
As I Please
187
Letter to John Middleton Murry
190
London Letter to Partisan Review
191
As I Please
196
As I Please
199
Letter to John Middleton Murry
202
As I Please
204
Tobias Smollett
244
As I Please
248
As I Please
252
Orwell Agate
255
As I Please
260
As I Please
263
As I Please
266
Review of The Vicar of Wakefield by Oliver Goldsmith
268
As I Please
273
As I Please
276
As I Please
279
Funny But Not Vulgar
283
As I Please
288
Letter to Frank Barber
291
London Letter to Partisan Review
293
Oysters and Brown Stout
299
As I Please
302
1945
307
A New Year Message
309
As I Please
313
As I Please
316
Review of The Unquiet Grave by Palinurus
318
As I Please
320
As I Please
323
As I Please
326
As I Please
329
Antisemitism in Britain
332
In Defence of P G Wodehouse
341
As I Please
355
Letter to Leonard Moore
358
Letter to Anthony Powell
359
Letter to Lydia Jackson
360
Notes on Nationalism
361
London Letter to Partisan Review
380
Letter to F J Warburg
386
Review of The Nigger of the Narcissus etc by Joseph Conrad
387
Unpublished Letter to the Editor of Tribune
389
Letter to Leonard Moore
392
London Letter to Partisan Review
393
Letter to Herbert Read
400
Letter to Frank Barber
402
Books by or containing contributions by George Orwell
407
Chronology
409
Index
413
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

George Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair in 1903 in Motihari in Bengal, India and later studied at Eton for four years. Orwell was an assistant superintendent with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma. He left the position after five years and then moved to Paris, where he wrote his first two books, Burmese Days and Down and Out In Paris. Orwell then moved to Spain to write but decided to join the United Workers Marxist Party Militia. After being decidedly opposed to communism, Orwell served in the British Home Guard and with the Indian Service of the BBC during World War II. He started writing for the Observer and was literary editor for the Tribune. Soon after he published the world-famous book, Animal Farm, which became a huge success for Orwell. It was then towards the end of his life when Orwell wrote Nineteen Eighty-Four. George Orwell died on January 23, 1950 in London.

Ian Angus is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Simon Fraser University.

Lenore Langsdorf is an associate professor in the Department of Speech Communication at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.