The Rollo Philosophy, Part 1

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Hogan and Thompson, 1843
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Page 5 - in this case a secondary, is by no means an unimportant object; and the discussion of the several topics proceeds accordingly, with regularity, upon a certain system of classification. This classification is based upon the more obvious external properties and relations of matter, and less upon those 1* which, though they are more extensive and
Page 5 - shall derive from them, is an influence on the cast of his intellectual character, which is receiving its permanent form during the years to which these writings are adapted. The acquisition of knowledge, however,
Page 4 - THE BOSTON TYPE AND STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY. PREFACE. THE main design in view, in the discussions which are offered to the juvenile world, under the title of THE ROLLO PHILOSOPHY, relates rather to their effect upon the little reader's habits of thinking, reasoning, and observation, than to the additions they may make to his stock of knowledge. The benefit which the author intends that the
Page 5 - PHILOSOPHY, relates rather to their effect upon the little reader's habits of thinking, reasoning, and observation, than to the additions they may make to his stock of knowledge. The benefit which the author intends that the
Page 51 - mother, this isn'ta good field at all.' " "Was that false induction?" said Rollo. " Yes: from a very few particulars, you came to a general conclusion, and your conclusion was wrong ; for we afterwards found them very large and very plentiful. To have made a sound induction, you ought to have waited till you had gone
Page 61 - take it up. And we cannot easily contrive any way to remove it. If the air would not take up water, then, whenever we should wet our hands, they would have to remain wet. And every thing else which we might touch would be wet. There would be no such thing as drying anything. 6
Page 51 - told you I knew a place where they were very thick and large. You went with me, and, as soon as we got into the field a little way, and you happened, for a few moments, at first, to find them few and small, you said,
Page 56 - Why, they spread about in the other air, and are redissolved; that is, the particles that compose them are taken up again by the air, and so they disappear." " That's curious," said Rollo. " I think it is very curious,
Page 54 - Air can only hold a certain quantity of moisture, though warm air can hold more than cold. So, if we want air to take up as much water as possible, and as fast as possible, we must warm it. Then, if we allow this warm air to take up as much water as it will hold, and afterwards
Page 164 - I promised that, if you would get James to come down to the dam, I would give you a lecture; but this does not seem to be a very good occasion. I can't lecture very well without either the apparatus or an audience." "I am very sorry our dam was carried away,

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