Origines Parochiales Scotiae: The Antiquities Ecclesiastical and Territorial of the Parishes of Scotland, Issue 97, Volume 2, Part 1

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W.H. Lizars, 1854 - Parishes - 846 pages
 

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Page 274 - That island has for its ruler an abbot, who is a priest, to whose direction all the province, and even the bishops contrary to the usual method are subject, according to the example of their first teacher, who was not a bishop, but a priest and monk ; of whose life and discourses some writings are said to be preserved by his disciples.
Page 255 - ... would be a light to his people, and maintain the true religion. The white apparel did afterwards belong to the poet by right. Then he was to receive a white rod in his hand, intimating that he had power to rule, not with tyranny and partiality, but with discretion and sincerity. Then he received his forefathers' sword, or some other sword, signifying that his duty was to protect and defend them from the incursions of their enemies in peace or war, as the obligations and customs of his predecessors...
Page 255 - I thought fit to annex the ceremony of proclaiming the Lord of the Isles. At this the Bishop of Argyle, the Bishop of the Isles, and seven priests, were sometimes present, but a bishop was always present, with the chieftains of all the principal families, and a Euler of the Isles.
Page 255 - He was clothed in a white habit, to show his innocence and integrity of heart, and that he would be a light to his people and maintain the true religion. The white apparel did afterwards belong to the poet by right. Then he was to receive a white rod in his hand, intimating that he had power to rule, not with tyranny and partiality, but with discretion and sincerity. Then he received his forefathers...
Page 256 - Moreover, there was a judge in every Isle for the discussion of all controversies, who had lands from Macdonald for their trouble, and likewise the eleventh part of every action decided. But there might still be an appeal to the Council of the Isles. MacFinnon was obliged to see weights and measures adjusted ; and MacDuffie, or MacPhie of Colonsay, kept the records of the Isles.
Page 261 - ... twentie mile lenthe from the north to the south, and sixteen myle in breadth from the eist to the west, fertil, fruitful, and full of natural grassing, with maney grate diere, maney woods, faire games of hunting beside everey toune, with ane...
Page 141 - Loch Awe, so that they should cause it to be built and repaired at the king's expense, as often as needful, and keep it safely for the king's necessity ; and that as often as he should come to it, the castle, well furnished, should be delivered to him to lodge and dwell there at his pleasure. Between the years 1390 and 1406 Robert III.
Page 255 - There was a table of stone where this council sat in the Isle of Finlaggan ; the which table, with the stone on which Macdonald sat, were carried away by Argyle with the bells that were at Icolumkill. Moreover, there was a judge in every Isle for the discussion of all controversies, who had lands from Macdonald for their trouble, and likewise the eleventh part of every action decided. But there might still be an appeal to the Council of the Isles.
Page x - ESQ. LIBRARIES. THE BRITISH MUSEUM. THE SOCIETY OF LINCOLN'S INN. THE FACULTY OF ADVOCATES. THE SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF SCOTLAND. THE SOCIETY OF WRITERS TO HM SIGNET. THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE. THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH. THE UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW. TRINITY COLLEGE, DUBLIN.
Page ix - THE REV. HEW SCOTT, AM JAMES R. HOPE SCOTT, ESQ. THE EARL OF SELKIRK. JAMES YOUNG SIMPSON, MD ALEXANDER SINCLAIR, ESQ. JAMES SKENE, ESQ. WILLIAM SMYTHE, ESQ.